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Improving the retention rate for residential treatment of substance abuse by sequential intervention for social anxiety

Staiger, Petra K.; Kyrios, Michael; Williams, James S.; Kambouropoulos, Nicolas; Howard, Alexandra; Gruenert, Stefan

Description

BACKGROUND Residential drug rehabilitation is often seen as a treatment of last resort for people with severe substance abuse issues. These clients present with more severe symptoms, and frequent psychiatric comorbidities relative to outpatients. Given the complex nature of this client group, a high proportion of clients seeking treatment often do not enter treatment, and of those who do, many exit prematurely. Given the highly social nature of residential drug rehabilitation services, it has...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorStaiger, Petra K.
dc.contributor.authorKyrios, Michael
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, James S.
dc.contributor.authorKambouropoulos, Nicolas
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorGruenert, Stefan
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-13T03:16:41Z
dc.date.available2016-01-13T03:16:41Z
dc.identifier.issn1471-244X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/95373
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Residential drug rehabilitation is often seen as a treatment of last resort for people with severe substance abuse issues. These clients present with more severe symptoms, and frequent psychiatric comorbidities relative to outpatients. Given the complex nature of this client group, a high proportion of clients seeking treatment often do not enter treatment, and of those who do, many exit prematurely. Given the highly social nature of residential drug rehabilitation services, it has been argued that social anxieties might decrease the likelihood of an individual entering treatment, or increase the likelihood of them prematurely exiting treatment. The current paper reports on the protocol of a Randomised Control Trial which examined whether treatment of social anxiety prior to entry to treatment improves entry rates and retention in residential drug rehabilitation. METHOD/DESIGN A Randomised Control Trial comparing a social skills treatment with a treatment as usual control group was employed. The social skills training program was based on the principles of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, and was adapted from Ron Rapee's social skills training program. A permutated block randomisation procedure was utilised. Participants are followed up at the completion of the program (or baseline plus six weeks for controls) and at three months following entry into residential rehabilitation (or six months post-baseline for participants who do not enter treatment). DISCUSSION The current study could potentially have implications for addressing social anxiety within residential drug treatment services in order to improve entry and retention in treatment. The results might suggest that the use of additional screening tools in intake assessments, a focus on coping with social anxieties in support groups for clients waiting to enter treatment, and greater awareness of social anxiety issues is warranted. AUSTRALIAN NEW ZEALAND CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRY Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN) registration number: ACTRN12611000579998.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported under Australian Research Council's Linkage Projects funding scheme (project number: LP0990162).
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rights© Staiger et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014 This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://​creativecommons.​org/​publicdomain/​zero/​1.​0/​) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.sourceBMC Psychiatry
dc.subjectadaptation, psychological
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectanxiety
dc.subjectcognitive therapy
dc.subjectdiagnosis, dual (psychiatry)
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthumans
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectphobic disorders
dc.subjectresearch design
dc.subjectsocial adjustment
dc.subjectsubstance-related disorders
dc.subjectmental health services
dc.subjectresidential treatment
dc.titleImproving the retention rate for residential treatment of substance abuse by sequential intervention for social anxiety
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume14
dc.date.issued2014-02-17
local.identifier.absfor170101
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5270653xPUB179
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationStaiger, Petra K, Deakin University, Australia
local.contributor.affiliationKyrios, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Psychology, School of Psychology, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationWilliams, James S, Deakin University, Australia
local.contributor.affiliationKambouropoulos, Nicolas, Deakin University, Australia
local.contributor.affiliationHoward, Alexandra, Deakin University, Australia
local.contributor.affiliationGruenert, Stefan, Odyssey House, Australia
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP0990162
local.identifier.essn1471-244X
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage43
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage43
local.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-244X-14-43
local.identifier.absseo920204
dc.date.updated2016-06-14T09:13:09Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84894526489
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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