Skip navigation
Skip navigation
Open Research will be down for maintenance between 8:00 and 8:15 am on Tuesday, December 1 2020.

Self-reported medication side effects in an older cohort living independently in the community - the Melbourne Longitudinal Study on Healthy Ageing (MELSHA): cross-sectional analysis of prevalence and risk factors

Thomson, Jennifer A.; Wang, Wei C.; Browning, Colette; Kendig, Hal L.

Description

BACKGROUND Medication side effects are an important cause of morbidity, mortality and costs in older people. The aim of our study was to examine prevalence and risk factors for self-reported medication side effects in an older cohort living independently in the community. METHODS The Melbourne Longitudinal Study on Healthy Ageing (MELSHA), collected information on those aged 65 years or older living independently in the community and commenced in 1994. Data on medication side effects was...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorThomson, Jennifer A.
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wei C.
dc.contributor.authorBrowning, Colette
dc.contributor.authorKendig, Hal L.
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-12T23:13:12Z
dc.date.available2016-01-12T23:13:12Z
dc.identifier.issn1471-2318
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/95359
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Medication side effects are an important cause of morbidity, mortality and costs in older people. The aim of our study was to examine prevalence and risk factors for self-reported medication side effects in an older cohort living independently in the community. METHODS The Melbourne Longitudinal Study on Healthy Ageing (MELSHA), collected information on those aged 65 years or older living independently in the community and commenced in 1994. Data on medication side effects was collected from the baseline cohort (n = 1000) in face-to-face baseline interviews in 1994 and analysed as cross-sectional data. Risk factors examined were: socio-demographics, health status and medical conditions; medication use and health service factors. Analysis included univariate logistic regression to estimate unadjusted risk and multivariate logistic regression analysis to assess confounding and estimate adjusted risk. RESULTS Self-reported medication side effects were reported by approximately 6.7% (67/1000) of the entire baseline MELSHA cohort, and by 8.5% (65/761) of those on medication. Identified risk factors were increased education level, co-morbidities and health service factors including recency of visiting the pharmacist, attending younger doctors, and their doctor's awareness of their medications. The greatest increase in risk for medication side effects was associated with liver problems and their doctor's awareness of their medications. Aging and gender were not risk factors. CONCLUSION Prevalence of self-reported medication side effects was comparable with that reported in adults attending General Practices in a primary care setting in Australia. The prevalence and identified risk factors provide further insight and opportunity to develop strategies to address the problem of medication side effects in older people living independently in the community setting.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Melbourne Longitudinal Studies on Healthy Ageing (MELSHA) program has been funded by a large number of grants and supporting agencies. They include the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Australian Research Council.
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rights© Thomson et al. 2010 This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.sourceBMC Geriatrics
dc.subjectaged
dc.subjectaged, 80 and over
dc.subjectcohort studies
dc.subjectcross-sectional studies
dc.subjectdrug-related side effects and adverse reactions
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthumans
dc.subjectlongitudinal studies
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectprevalence
dc.subjectrisk factors
dc.subjectvictoria
dc.subjectaging
dc.subjecthealth status
dc.subjectindependent living
dc.subjectresidence characteristics
dc.titleSelf-reported medication side effects in an older cohort living independently in the community - the Melbourne Longitudinal Study on Healthy Ageing (MELSHA): cross-sectional analysis of prevalence and risk factors
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume10
dc.date.issued2010-06-10
local.identifier.absfor111799
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5637259xPUB13
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationThomson, Jennifer, Monash University, Australia
local.contributor.affiliationWang, Wei, Monash University, Australia
local.contributor.affiliationBrowning, Colette, Monash University, Australia
local.contributor.affiliationKendig, Hal, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Population Health, Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1471-2318
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage37
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage11
local.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2318-10-37
local.identifier.absseo940103
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:36:59Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77953233903
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Thomson_Self-reported_medication_side_2010.pdfPublished Version340.81 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator