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Discrimination of complex textures by bees

Maddess, Ted; Davey, M; Yang, E

Description

A problem confronted by visual systems is that of discriminating textures. It appears that a recently described class of orientation-tuned neurones in the bee brain embody properties of mechanisms used by humans to discriminate complex textures. In particular these mechanisms would permit bees to discriminate a large range of textures by giving bees access to information related to higher-order correlations between texture elements. To determine if bees can exploit such textural information we...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMaddess, Ted
dc.contributor.authorDavey, M
dc.contributor.authorYang, E
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:40:39Z
dc.identifier.issn0340-7594
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/94565
dc.description.abstractA problem confronted by visual systems is that of discriminating textures. It appears that a recently described class of orientation-tuned neurones in the bee brain embody properties of mechanisms used by humans to discriminate complex textures. In particular these mechanisms would permit bees to discriminate a large range of textures by giving bees access to information related to higher-order correlations between texture elements. To determine if bees can exploit such textural information we have conducted behavioural experiments employing iso-dipole textures, that statistically speaking, differ from binary noise textures, and each other, only in their third-order correlation functions. While these textures are not themselves of any ethological significance their special properties permit us to show that bees can potentially use a very large palette of textures to classify textured objects. In electrophysiological experiments we demonstrate the requisite contrast sign invariance (rectification) of the orientation-selective neurones' responses and discuss other similarities of these neurones' responses to models accounting for human texture discrimination.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.sourceJournal of Comparative Physiology A: Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
dc.subjectKeywords: Bees; Iso-dipole; Orientation; Pattern; Texture
dc.titleDiscrimination of complex textures by bees
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume184
dc.date.issued1999
local.identifier.absfor179999 - Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub24172
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMaddess, Ted, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDavey, M, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationYang, E, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage107
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage177
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s003590050310
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T09:29:58Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0033066333
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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