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Optimal stomatal control in relation to leaf area and nitrogen content

Buckley, Thomas; Miller, Jeffrey; Farquhar, Graham

Description

We introduce the simultaneous optimisation of water-use efficiency and nitrogen-use efficiency of canopy photosynthesis. As a vehicle for this idea we consider the optimal leaf area for a plant in which there is no self-shading among leaves. An emergent result is that canopy assimilation over a day is a scaled sum of daily water use and of photosynthetic nitrogen display. The respective scaling factors are the marginal carbon benefits of extra transpiration and extra such nitrogen,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.authorFarquhar, Graham
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:40:10Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T23:40:10Z
dc.identifier.issn0037-5330
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/94338
dc.description.abstractWe introduce the simultaneous optimisation of water-use efficiency and nitrogen-use efficiency of canopy photosynthesis. As a vehicle for this idea we consider the optimal leaf area for a plant in which there is no self-shading among leaves. An emergent result is that canopy assimilation over a day is a scaled sum of daily water use and of photosynthetic nitrogen display. The respective scaling factors are the marginal carbon benefits of extra transpiration and extra such nitrogen, respectively. The simple approach successfully predicts that as available water increases, or evaporative demand decreases, the leaf area should increase, with a concomitant reduction in nitrogen per unit leaf area. The changes in stomatal conductance are therefore less than would occur if leaf area were not to change. As irradiance increases, the modelled leaf area decreases, and nitrogen/leaf area increases. As total available nitrogen increases, leaf area also increases. In all the examples examined, the sharing by leaf area and properties per unit leaf area means that predicted changes in either are less than if predicted in isolation. We suggest that were plant density to be included, it too would further share the response, further diminishing the changes required per unit leaf area.
dc.publisherSuomen Geologinen Seura
dc.sourceSilva Fennica
dc.subjectKeywords: Nitrogen; Optimization; Photosynthesis; Stomatal control; Plants (botany); leaf area; nitrogen; nutrient use; stomatal conductance; water use efficiency Optimal leaf area; Optimality theory; Resource substitution; Stomatal conductance
dc.titleOptimal stomatal control in relation to leaf area and nitrogen content
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume36
dc.date.issued2002
local.identifier.absfor060705 - Plant Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub23905
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFarquhar, Graham, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBuckley, Thomas, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMiller, Jeffrey, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage625
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage637
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T09:28:08Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0036403750
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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