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Effect of temperature on development and survival in Delias nigrina (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

Braby, Michael; Lyonns, Kelly

Description

The effect of temperature on rate of development and survival of the immature stages of a subtropical population of the black jezebel, Delias nigrina, was studied under laboratory conditions at a range of constant temperatures. Mean developmental times from first-instar larva to adult varied from 29 days at 27°C to 52 days at 19°C; the development threshold temperature and thermal constant were estimated to be 9°C and 494 degree-days, respectively. Larval developmental rates reached...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBraby, Michael
dc.contributor.authorLyonns, Kelly
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:39:58Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T23:39:58Z
dc.identifier.issn1326-6756
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/94259
dc.description.abstractThe effect of temperature on rate of development and survival of the immature stages of a subtropical population of the black jezebel, Delias nigrina, was studied under laboratory conditions at a range of constant temperatures. Mean developmental times from first-instar larva to adult varied from 29 days at 27°C to 52 days at 19°C; the development threshold temperature and thermal constant were estimated to be 9°C and 494 degree-days, respectively. Larval developmental rates reached physiological maximum at the higher temperatures tested (25-27°C). Pupal development, by contrast, was not affected in the same way as larvae by higher temperature. Survival of the immature stages varied inversely with temperature: survival was highest at 19°C and significantly reduced at 27°C. Mortality at the higher temperature was attributable mainly to final-instar larvae and pupae. These findings indicate that, compared with other tropical pierids that have been studied, D. nigrina has: (i) a comparatively low temperature threshold; (ii) a slow rate of development; and (iii) a poor tolerance to moderately high temperatures. Physiologically, these features are more characteristic of a temperate butterfly than a tropical one. This physiological response appears to be reflected by the temperate nature of the genus as a whole, which may be related to its period of origin and evolution during past climatic events.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of Entomology
dc.subjectKeywords: Delias; Delias nigrina; Lepidoptera; Pieridae Australia; Development; New Guinea; Thermal constant; Threshold temperature; Tropical ecology
dc.titleEffect of temperature on development and survival in Delias nigrina (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume42
dc.date.issued2003
local.identifier.absfor060311 - Speciation and Extinction
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub23797
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBraby, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLyonns, Kelly, Griffith University
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage138
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage143
local.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1440-6055.2003.00342.x
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T09:27:22Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0037987887
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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