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Evidence for velocity-tuned motion-sensitive descending neurons in the honeybee

Ibbotson, Michael

Description

Behavioural experiments suggest the existence of two functionally distinct movement-sensitive pathways in honeybees: one mediates optomotor behaviour, consisting of reflexive turning responses preventing deviations from course, and the other controls flight speed. The first consists of direction-selective neurons responding optimally to a particular temporal frequency of motion, regardless of the pattern's spatial structure. The temporal frequency dependence matches the temporal tuning of the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorIbbotson, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:26:45Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/92995
dc.description.abstractBehavioural experiments suggest the existence of two functionally distinct movement-sensitive pathways in honeybees: one mediates optomotor behaviour, consisting of reflexive turning responses preventing deviations from course, and the other controls flight speed. The first consists of direction-selective neurons responding optimally to a particular temporal frequency of motion, regardless of the pattern's spatial structure. The temporal frequency dependence matches the temporal tuning of the optomotor output. Behavioural experiments suggest the second pathway contains velocity-tuned cells, which generate equal-sized responses for any given image velocity, for patterns with a range of spatial structures. Here, recordings were made from direction-selective neurons in the honeybee's ventral nerve cord. Neurons were tested for responses to motion at velocities of 40-1000 deg s-1 using four gratings with spatial periods of 11-76°. In addition to temporal frequency-dependent optomotor neurons, direction-selective cells were found that had the same shaped velocity-response functions for all four patterns. The velocity-tuning properties of these cells suggest a possible role in monitoring flight speed because their velocity tuning matches the image velocities encountered during free flight and landing behaviour.
dc.publisherRoyal Society of London
dc.sourceProceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences
dc.subjectKeywords: honeybee; nervous system; velocity; vision; animal behavior; article; cell ultrastructure; flying; frequency analysis; honeybee; locomotion; movement (physiology); nerve cell; neuroanatomy; nonhuman; priority journal; velocity; Animals; Bees; Neurons; Vis Insect vision; Velocity tuning; Visual descending neuron
dc.titleEvidence for velocity-tuned motion-sensitive descending neurons in the honeybee
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume268
dc.date.issued2001
local.identifier.absfor110906 - Sensory Systems
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub26274
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationIbbotson, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2195
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2201
local.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2001.1770
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T09:47:49Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0035823870
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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