Skip navigation
Skip navigation

A comparison of techniques for sampling amphibians in the forests of south-east Queensland, Australia

Parris, Kirstem M; Norton, Tony Wallace; Cunningham, Ross

Description

We employed three techniques for sampling amphibians (nocturnal stream searching, pitfall traps with drift fences, and automatic tape recording of anuran calls) concurrently for six nights at 20 forest sites in south-east Queensland, Australia, to compare their performance. Nocturnal stream searching was the most sensitive sampling technique, detecting the most species with the fewest nights of survey. Pitfall trapping was the least sensitive sampling technique. On average, a minimum of four...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorParris, Kirstem M
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Tony Wallace
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Ross
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:24:01Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T23:24:01Z
dc.identifier.issn0018-0831
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/92038
dc.description.abstractWe employed three techniques for sampling amphibians (nocturnal stream searching, pitfall traps with drift fences, and automatic tape recording of anuran calls) concurrently for six nights at 20 forest sites in south-east Queensland, Australia, to compare their performance. Nocturnal stream searching was the most sensitive sampling technique, detecting the most species with the fewest nights of survey. Pitfall trapping was the least sensitive sampling technique. On average, a minimum of four nights of survey was required to detect the range of amphibian species present at a site. Nocturnal stream searches and automatic tape recorders were robust in the range of conditions encountered during the survey, with no significant relationships found between temporal or spatial variation in their performance and weather or site conditions. This systematic study represents one of few to compare different techniques for sampling amphibians in a given region, and the first such study to compare automatic tape recording of anuran calls with other, more traditional sampling techniques.
dc.publisherEast Tennessee University
dc.sourceHerpetologica
dc.subjectKeywords: amphibian; sampling; Australia Amphibians; Australia; Forests; Frogs; Monitoring; Sampling techniques; Survey
dc.titleA comparison of techniques for sampling amphibians in the forests of south-east Queensland, Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume55
dc.date.issued1999
local.identifier.absfor050211 - Wildlife and Habitat Management
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub23006
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationParris, Kirstem M, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationNorton, Tony, University of Tasmania
local.contributor.affiliationCunningham, Ross, Administrative Division, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage271
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage283
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T09:18:55Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0032844141
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

There are no files associated with this item.


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator