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Immunotherapeutic Potential of Dendritic Cells Generated in Long Term Stroma-Dependent Cultures

O'Neill, Helen; Jonas, N; Wilson, Heather; Ni, Keping

Description

Long term cultures (LTC) producing dendritic cells (DC) have been established from spleen. A well developed stromal cell layer supported production of DC in numbers suitable for experimentation. Cells had obvious membrane pseudopodia and could be collected from culture every 2-3 days. Large cells produced in LTC stained with fluorescently labelled monoclonal antibodies specific for DC such as 33D1, and M1/70 which is specific for DC and myeloid cells. These staining patterns confirmed the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Helen
dc.contributor.authorJonas, N
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Heather
dc.contributor.authorNi, Keping
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:24:00Z
dc.identifier.issn1084-9785
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/92030
dc.description.abstractLong term cultures (LTC) producing dendritic cells (DC) have been established from spleen. A well developed stromal cell layer supported production of DC in numbers suitable for experimentation. Cells had obvious membrane pseudopodia and could be collected from culture every 2-3 days. Large cells produced in LTC stained with fluorescently labelled monoclonal antibodies specific for DC such as 33D1, and M1/70 which is specific for DC and myeloid cells. These staining patterns confirmed the presence of DC within the LTC population. LTC-DC were tested and shown capable of migration in vivo in B10. A(2R) mice following footpad inoculation. Most cells entered the spleen and a small number entered popliteal lymph node. LTC-DC have migratory capacity comparable with control spleen lymphocytes. LTC-DC were tested for capacity to induce an anti-tumour immune response after exposing cells to tumour cell membranes. LTC-DC pulsed with BL/VL3 tumour antigens were able to induce a BL/VL3-specific primary cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response detectable in popliteal lymph nodes and spleen of C57BL/6J mice within 6 days of priming. BL/VL3 turnout cells grew in sublethally irradiated C57BL/6J mice giving 100% mortality. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells from mice given BL/VL3 antigen-pulsed LTC-DC, two weeks previously, significantly slowed the growth of BL/VL3 tumour cells in mice. DC produced in LTC can function as antigen presenting cells (APC) when adoptively transferred into animals. Their capacity to migrate effectively, to induce a CTL response and to reduce tumour load suggests that DC grown using this in vitro system may have valuable clinical potential in humans.
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert Inc.
dc.sourceCancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals
dc.subjectKeywords: adoptive transfer; animal tissue; antigen presenting cell; article; cell culture; cell migration; cellular immunity; dendritic cell; immunotherapy; mouse; nonhuman; priority journal; spleen lymphocyte; stroma cell; Adoptive Transfer; Animals; Cells, Cultu Cytotoxic T cells; Dendritic cells; Immunotherapy; Long term culture; Tumour immunity
dc.titleImmunotherapeutic Potential of Dendritic Cells Generated in Long Term Stroma-Dependent Cultures
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume14
dc.date.issued2000
local.identifier.absfor110708 - Transplantation Immunology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub22994
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationO'Neill, Helen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationJonas, N, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWilson, Heather, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationNi, Keping, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage263
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage276
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T09:18:51Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0032807753
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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