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Herbicides, weeds and endangered species: management of bitou bush ( Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata ) with glyphosate and impacts on the endangered shrub, Pimelea spicata

Matarczyk, Julie A; Willis, Anthony J; Vranjic, John; Ash, Julian

Description

Environmental weed invasion threatens the biodiversity of native species. Unfortunately, managing these weeds may also affect biodiversity adversely. A recent example occurred when glyphosate, a herbicide used to control the highly invasive weed, bitou bush (Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata), accidentally drifted over a small population of an endangered shrub, Pimelea spicata. Following concerns that the affected population would not recover and, thereby, cause the local extinction of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMatarczyk, Julie A
dc.contributor.authorWillis, Anthony J
dc.contributor.authorVranjic, John
dc.contributor.authorAsh, Julian
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:23:01Z
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/91713
dc.description.abstractEnvironmental weed invasion threatens the biodiversity of native species. Unfortunately, managing these weeds may also affect biodiversity adversely. A recent example occurred when glyphosate, a herbicide used to control the highly invasive weed, bitou bush (Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata), accidentally drifted over a small population of an endangered shrub, Pimelea spicata. Following concerns that the affected population would not recover and, thereby, cause the local extinction of P. spicata, we conducted a series of glasshouse and field experiments to explore the impacts of glyphosate on this endangered species. Seedlings and young plants of P. spicata, in which the tap root was undeveloped, were killed by a single application of glyphosate. Older plants with a well developed tap root also died back initially, but about 50% of individuals re-sprouted. This re-growth was associated with a significant decrease in tap root diameter, implying that further disturbance, including repeated treatment with glyphosate, would kill plants by impairing their potential for recovery. Unlike some sclerophyllous native shrubs, the tolerance of P. spicata to glyphosate was limited, even when its growth was slowed artificially by limiting water availability. Winter applications of glyphosate to manage infestations of bitou bush will impact adversely on populations of P. spicata and may also affect the other rare and endangered species whose survival is threatened by this species, even though some natives are unaffected by the herbicide. Protecting native biodiversity from bitou bush will involve sustainable weed management that minimises impacts on non-target native species.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceBiological Conservation
dc.subjectKeywords: endangered species; shrub; species conservation; weed control; Pimelea Bitou bush; Endangered species; Glyphosate; Pimelea; Weed management
dc.titleHerbicides, weeds and endangered species: management of bitou bush ( Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata ) with glyphosate and impacts on the endangered shrub, Pimelea spicata
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume108
dc.date.issued2002
local.identifier.absfor060704 - Plant Pathology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub22559
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMatarczyk, Julie A, CSIRO Division of Plant Industry
local.contributor.affiliationWillis, Anthony J, CSIRO Division of Plant Industry
local.contributor.affiliationVranjic, John, CSIRO Division of Plant Industry
local.contributor.affiliationAsh, Julian, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage133
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage141
local.identifier.doi10.1016/S0006-3207(02)00062-9
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T09:13:40Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0036883772
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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