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Education, activity, health, blood pressure and Apoliprotein E as predictors of cognitive change in old age: a review

Christensen, Helen; Anstey, Kaarin

Description

Background: Cross-sectional studies have identified a number of health and lifestyle factors that correlate with cognitive function in old age. It is important to know whether these factors also predict change in cognitive function over time. Objective: To evaluate published findings on genetic, health and lifestyle predictors of cognitive change in late adulthood. Methods: Studies reporting data on education, health, blood pressure, activity and apolipoprotein E (APOE) as predictors of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorChristensen, Helen
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:21:57Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T23:21:57Z
dc.identifier.issn0304-324X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/91218
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cross-sectional studies have identified a number of health and lifestyle factors that correlate with cognitive function in old age. It is important to know whether these factors also predict change in cognitive function over time. Objective: To evaluate published findings on genetic, health and lifestyle predictors of cognitive change in late adulthood. Methods: Studies reporting data on education, health, blood pressure, activity and apolipoprotein E (APOE) as predictors of cognitive change were reviewed. A total of 34 studies were identified that reported data on these predictors. The average follow-up period of studies reviewed was 7.68 years. Results: Results showed that education, hy pertension, objective indices of health and cardiovascular disease, and APOE were associated with cognitive change. Results regarding the effect of physical activity on cognitive change were inconclusive. Conclusion: Despite the lack of data on some predictors, the longitudinal trends are generally consistent with cross-sectional findings on predictors of cognitive performance in old age. More research is required to compare the influence of predictors on different types of cognitive abilities.
dc.publisherS Karger AG
dc.sourceGerontology
dc.subjectKeywords: apolipoprotein E; adult; aged; aging; article; blood pressure; cognition; follow up; health status; human; hypertension; normal human; physical activity; prediction; priority journal; socioeconomics; Aged; Aging; Apolipoproteins E; Australia; Blood Pressu Apolipoprotein E; Blood pressure; Cognitive aging; Education
dc.titleEducation, activity, health, blood pressure and Apoliprotein E as predictors of cognitive change in old age: a review
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume46
dc.date.issued2000
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub21891
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationChristensen, Helen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage163
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage177
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T09:09:21Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0034113888
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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