Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Hexose Transport in Asexual Stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Kinetoplastidae

Krishna, Sanjeev; Woodrow, C; Burchmore, R; Saliba, Kevin; Kirk, Kiaran

Description

The hexose sugar, glucose, is a vital energy source for most organisms and an essential nutrient for asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Kinetoplastid organisms (eg. Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp) also require glucose at certain critical stages of their life cycles. Although phylogenetically unrelated, these organisms share many common challenges during the mammalian stages of a parasitic life cycle, and possess hexose uptake mechanisms that are amenable to study using similar methods....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKrishna, Sanjeev
dc.contributor.authorWoodrow, C
dc.contributor.authorBurchmore, R
dc.contributor.authorSaliba, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorKirk, Kiaran
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:20:45Z
dc.identifier.issn0169-4758
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/90851
dc.description.abstractThe hexose sugar, glucose, is a vital energy source for most organisms and an essential nutrient for asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Kinetoplastid organisms (eg. Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp) also require glucose at certain critical stages of their life cycles. Although phylogenetically unrelated, these organisms share many common challenges during the mammalian stages of a parasitic life cycle, and possess hexose uptake mechanisms that are amenable to study using similar methods. Defining hexose permeation pathways into parasites might expose an Achilles' heel at which both antidisease and antiparasite measures can be aimed. Understanding the mode of entry of glucose also presents a good general model for substrate acquisition in multicompartment systems. In this review, Sanjeev Krishna and colleagues summarize current understanding of hexose transport processes in P. falciparum and provide a comparison with data obtained from kinetoplastids.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceParasitology Today
dc.subjectKeywords: antiparasitic agent; glucose; hexose; biological model; energy resource; flagellate; hexose transport; Leishmania; life cycle; nonhuman; nutrient; Plasmodium falciparum; reproduction; review; Trypanosoma; Animals; Biological Transport; Host-Parasite Relat
dc.titleHexose Transport in Asexual Stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Kinetoplastidae
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume16
dc.date.issued2000
local.identifier.absfor060110 - Receptors and Membrane Biology
local.identifier.absfor060502 - Infectious Agents
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub21334
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationKrishna, Sanjeev, St. George's Hospital Medical School
local.contributor.affiliationWoodrow, C, St George's Hospital Medical School
local.contributor.affiliationBurchmore, R, St George's Hospital Medical School
local.contributor.affiliationSaliba, Kevin, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKirk, Kiaran, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue12
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage516
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage521
local.identifier.doi10.1016/S0169-4758(00)01762-2
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T09:04:25Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0034410938
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Krishna_Hexose_Transport_in_Asexual_2000.pdf428.79 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator