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The Role of Internal Waves in the Layering of Outflows from Semi-Enclosed Seas

Bidokhti, Ali A; Griffiths, Ross

Description

Outflows from semi-enclosed marginal seas typically involve complex layered structures and inversions in vertical profiles of temperature and salinity. We have carried out experiments with turbulent plumes and their outflows in an enclosed, stratified environment. Low frequency internal waves excited by the plume outflow itself, as it intrudes into the surrounding stratification at its depth of neutral buoyancy, produce horizontal counter-flowing shear layers. These ‘shearing modes’...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBidokhti, Ali A
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Ross
dc.coverage.spatialAdelaide Australia
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:16:23Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T23:16:23Z
dc.date.createdDecember 9 2001
dc.identifier.isbn1876346337
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/89384
dc.description.abstractOutflows from semi-enclosed marginal seas typically involve complex layered structures and inversions in vertical profiles of temperature and salinity. We have carried out experiments with turbulent plumes and their outflows in an enclosed, stratified environment. Low frequency internal waves excited by the plume outflow itself, as it intrudes into the surrounding stratification at its depth of neutral buoyancy, produce horizontal counter-flowing shear layers. These ‘shearing modes’ lead to branching that breaks up the outflow into a number of layers with a vertical scale determined by the structure of the upward propagating wave modes. In the oceans this scale is predicted to be of order 100m. In experiments with two diffusing components (T and S) doublediffusive convection develops thin interfaces and salt fingers between the counter-flowing layers. However, the convection is parasitic and does not generate the layers or influence their thickness. Oceanic outflows too are prone to doublediffusive convection but in this case the convecting layers, 10m to 30m thick, are potentially distinguishable from the larger ‘shearing mode’ structure.
dc.publisherUniversity of Adelaide
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAustralasian Fluid Mechanics Conference 2001
dc.sourceProceedings of the 14th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference
dc.source.urihttps://people.eng.unimelb.edu.au/imarusic/proceedings/14/FM010010.PDF
dc.titleThe Role of Internal Waves in the Layering of Outflows from Semi-Enclosed Seas
dc.typeConference paper
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2001
local.identifier.absfor040503 - Physical Oceanography
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub19391
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBidokhti, A, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGriffiths, Ross, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage885
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage888
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T08:47:56Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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