Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Questions and answers in Chinese political press conferences

Du, Xujia

Description

Since China’s opening up in 1978, there has been increasing interaction between the Chinese government and the domestic and international media. Previous research has shown that journalists from developed countries take an adversarial role when questioning politicians in news interviews and press conferences while journalists from developing countries like China take a role that furthers the agenda of their governments. The literature has also demonstrated that evasiveness is observed in the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDu, Xujia
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-05T23:58:42Z
dc.date.available2011-12-05T23:58:42Z
dc.identifier.otherb38070911
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/8759
dc.description.abstractSince China’s opening up in 1978, there has been increasing interaction between the Chinese government and the domestic and international media. Previous research has shown that journalists from developed countries take an adversarial role when questioning politicians in news interviews and press conferences while journalists from developing countries like China take a role that furthers the agenda of their governments. The literature has also demonstrated that evasiveness is observed in the answers of politicians from both developed and developing countries. Although much attention has been given to politician-media interaction in the western developed countries, there is a scarcity of research on political communication in the Chinese context and on cross-cultural differences in political communication between China and other countries. Using conversation analysis methodology and quantitative analysis, this thesis analyzed questions and answers fro m political press conferences in China in order to show 1) how adversarialness and evasiveness were encoded in journalists’ questions and politiciansâ’ answers respectively; 2) whether there was a difference in adversarialness between journalists from different socio-political backgrounds, and 3) the relationship between adversarialness and evasiveness. The analysis revealed that journalists from developed countries displayed a higher level of adversarialness in their questions than Chinese journalist and that a higher level of journalistic adversarialness was more likely to result in a higher level of evasiveness in politicians’ answers. While journalists resorted to various strategies to pose adversarial questions, politicians also employed different structural designs and techniques to mitigate their evasive answers.
dc.format.extent166 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCanberra, ACT : The Australian National University
dc.rightsAuthor retains copyright
dc.subjectQuestions, answers, adversarialness, evasiveness, political press conferences, Chinese
dc.titleQuestions and answers in Chinese political press conferences
dc.typeThesis (Masters sub-thesis)
local.contributor.supervisorRendle-Short, Johanna
local.description.notesSupervisor - Dr Johanna Rendle-Short
dcterms.dateAccepted2011-10
dc.date.issued2011
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.citationDu, Xujia (2011) Questions and answers in Chinese political press conferences, Thesis (Masters sub-thesis) ANU
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d78dd07ca94e
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dcterms.licenseThis thesis has been made available through exception 200AB to the Copyright Act.
local.mintdoimint
CollectionsOpen Access Theses

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
02Whole_Du.pdfWhole Thesis 1.01 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
01Front_Du.pdfFront Matter98.84 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator