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Islands of Neglect

Reilly, Benjamin

Description

Weak governance, widespread corruption, economic mismanagement, nsmg crime, and violent ethnic conflicts are undermining the stability of the island nations of the South Pacific. As some countries assume the status of Somalialike 'failed states', the formerly benign South Pacific islands represent a growing threat to regional security. This process has been hastened by the lack of attention to the region's problems by traditional powers like the United States, Australia and New Zealand....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorReilly, Benjamin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:09:15Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T23:09:15Z
dc.identifier.isbn1877175137
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/86916
dc.description.abstractWeak governance, widespread corruption, economic mismanagement, nsmg crime, and violent ethnic conflicts are undermining the stability of the island nations of the South Pacific. As some countries assume the status of Somalialike 'failed states', the formerly benign South Pacific islands represent a growing threat to regional security. This process has been hastened by the lack of attention to the region's problems by traditional powers like the United States, Australia and New Zealand. Now, rising Asian powers like China and Taiwan - which have important diplomatic, economic and strategic interests in the region - are moving to fill the vacuum created by the weakness of the region's states and their debilitating internal conflicts. The facts of these internal conflicts are grim. Over the past year, there has been a coup in Fiji, followed two weeks later by the overthrow, at gunpoint, of the Solomon Islands government and a bloody civil war between rival ethnic militias. There has also been insubordination by the disciplined forces in Vanuatu, the assassination of a cabinet minister in Samoa, and growing criminal influence in 'rnicrostates' like Nauru and Tuvalu. In March 2001 the region's largest country, Papua New Guinea, saw a short-lived uprising by elements of the Defence Force against their own government as part of a pay dispute. The region is also mired in sub-standard economic performance. In fact, the South Pacific is on a par with sub-Saharan Africa in its per capita GDP, literacy and schooling rates, public health statistics and, ominously, in its lack of economic opportunity for young job seekers. What underlying forces are driving this 'Africanization' of the South Pacific region?
dc.publisherUniversity of Canterbury and ANU
dc.relation.ispartofArc of Instability: Melanesia in the Early 2000s
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.rights© Macmillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies, UC and State, Society and Governance in Melanesia Project, ANU, 2003
dc.titleIslands of Neglect
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2003
local.identifier.absfor160608 - New Zealand Government and Politics
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub15974
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationReilly, Benjamin, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage63
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage66
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T08:18:22Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationNew Zealand and Australia
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Dept. of Pacific Affairs (DPA) formerly State, Society and Governance in Melanesia (SSGM) Program

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