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Phosphorus acquisition from soil by white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.), species with contrasting root development

Watt, M; Evans, John

Description

White lupin and soybean have contrasting root morphologies: white lupin develops proteoid or cluster roots, roots with discreet clusters of short, determinate branch roots (rootlets) while soybean develops a more fibrous root system with evenly distributed, longer branch roots. Growth and P acquisition by white lupin and soybean were compared in a soil high in bound, total P, with or without additional inorganic P applied in solution. Additional P increased biomass by 25% and doubled total P in...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWatt, M
dc.contributor.authorEvans, John
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:08:06Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T23:08:06Z
dc.identifier.issn0032-079X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/86515
dc.description.abstractWhite lupin and soybean have contrasting root morphologies: white lupin develops proteoid or cluster roots, roots with discreet clusters of short, determinate branch roots (rootlets) while soybean develops a more fibrous root system with evenly distributed, longer branch roots. Growth and P acquisition by white lupin and soybean were compared in a soil high in bound, total P, with or without additional inorganic P applied in solution. Additional P increased biomass by 25% and doubled total P in soybean. In contrast, white lupin did not respond to additional P in biomass or total P. However added P decreased cluster development on proteoid roots indicating that white lupin sensed the added P. The reduction in cluster weight per plant was exactly countered by an increase in dry weight of other roots. Soybean root development responded to P application, proliferating branch roots with active meristems in the upper portion of the soil profile where P was applied, and reducing root weight to plant weight by 13%. White lupin did not proliferate roots in response to P application. When P was not added to soil, soybean and lupin acquired similar P per unit root dry weight. However, white lupin accumulated 4.8 times more P per unit root length, suggesting that P acquisition in these plants involved other mechanisms such as the exudation of P solubilizing compounds. Soybean accessed P by developing more root length thus colonising more soil volume than white lupin and, therefore, was better able to take advantage of the added P. Pericycle and root tip meristem activities were critical to the differences in root development between white lupin and soybean, and therefore their responses to plant and soil P.
dc.publisherKluwer Academic Publishers
dc.sourcePlant and Soil
dc.subjectKeywords: morphology; nutrient availability; phosphorus; root system; soil chemistry; Glycine max; Lupinus; Lupinus albus Cluster roots; Proteoid roots; Root architecture; Root development; Soil phosphorus; Soybean; White lupin
dc.titlePhosphorus acquisition from soil by white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.), species with contrasting root development
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume248
dc.date.issued2003
local.identifier.absfor060705 - Plant Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub15421
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWatt, M, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEvans, John, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage271
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage283
local.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1022332700686
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T08:12:15Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0038365568
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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