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A white-capped Albatross, Thalassarche [cauta] steadi , at South Georgia: first confirmed record in the south-western Atlantic

Phalan, Ben; Phillips, Richard; Double, Michael

Description

Although albatrosses typically show strong natal philopatry, a small proportion of birds emigrate to distant colonies, occasionally establishing new breeding sites and potentially initiating speciation events. Patterns of albatross distribution and speciation may be determined largely by the behaviour of these few wayward individuals. In February 2003, a male White-capped Albatross, Thalassarche [cauta] steadi (identified from DNA), was observed in a colony of Black-browed Albatrosses, T....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPhalan, Ben
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Richard
dc.contributor.authorDouble, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:07:33Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T23:07:33Z
dc.identifier.issn0158-4197
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/86258
dc.description.abstractAlthough albatrosses typically show strong natal philopatry, a small proportion of birds emigrate to distant colonies, occasionally establishing new breeding sites and potentially initiating speciation events. Patterns of albatross distribution and speciation may be determined largely by the behaviour of these few wayward individuals. In February 2003, a male White-capped Albatross, Thalassarche [cauta] steadi (identified from DNA), was observed in a colony of Black-browed Albatrosses, T. melanophrys, at Bird Island, South Georgia. It returned to the same colony the following austral spring. Although there have been previous records of shy-type albatrosses (T. [cauta] steadi or T. [cauta] cauta) in the south-western Atlantic Ocean, this is the first confirmed record of either taxon, and indicates the potential for colonisation, over 10000 km from its present breeding range.
dc.publisherRoyal Australasian Ornithologists Union
dc.sourceEmu
dc.subjectKeywords: new record; range expansion; seabird; Antarctica; Arctic and Antarctic; Bird Island [South Georgia]; South Georgia; World; Aves; Ciconiiformes; Diomedea melanophris; Thalassarche cauta cauta
dc.titleA white-capped Albatross, Thalassarche [cauta] steadi , at South Georgia: first confirmed record in the south-western Atlantic
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume104
dc.date.issued2004
local.identifier.absfor060205 - Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub15074
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPhalan, Ben, Natural Environment Research Council
local.contributor.affiliationPhillips, Richard, Natural Environment Research Council
local.contributor.affiliationDouble, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage359
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage361
local.identifier.doi10.1071/MU03057
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T08:09:28Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-13444309535
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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