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A Population survey found an association between self-reports of traumatic brain injury and increased psychiatric symptoms

Butterworth, Peter; Jorm, Anthony F; Christensen, Helen; Windsor, Timothy; Rodgers, Bryan; Anstey, Kaarin

Description

Objective This study determined whether self-reported Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), identified in a community sample and occurring up to 60 years previously, is associated with current psychiatric symptoms, suicidality, and psychologic well-being. Study design and setting Three age cohorts (20-24, 40-44, 60-64) were randomly sampled from the cities of Canberra and Queanbeyan, Australia, yielding a total of 7,485 participants. The samples were administered scales measuring anxiety, depression,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorButterworth, Peter
dc.contributor.authorJorm, Anthony F
dc.contributor.authorChristensen, Helen
dc.contributor.authorWindsor, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Bryan
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:06:14Z
dc.identifier.issn0895-4356
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/85936
dc.description.abstractObjective This study determined whether self-reported Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), identified in a community sample and occurring up to 60 years previously, is associated with current psychiatric symptoms, suicidality, and psychologic well-being. Study design and setting Three age cohorts (20-24, 40-44, 60-64) were randomly sampled from the cities of Canberra and Queanbeyan, Australia, yielding a total of 7,485 participants. The samples were administered scales measuring anxiety, depression, suicidality, positive and negative affect, personality traits, and physical health status. Results Of the total sample, 5.7% reported history of TBI involving loss of consciousness for at least 15 min, occurring an average of 22 years previously. History of TBI was associated with increased symptoms of depression, anxiety, negative affect, and suicidal ideation. Conclusion History of TBI is a risk factor for psychiatric morbidity. The effect is greatest in young adults, and occurs up to several decades subsequent to the occurrence of TBI.
dc.publisherPergamon-Elsevier Ltd
dc.sourceJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
dc.titleA Population survey found an association between self-reports of traumatic brain injury and increased psychiatric symptoms
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume57
dc.date.issued2004
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub14628
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationButterworth, Peter, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationJorm, Anthony F, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationChristensen, Helen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRodgers, Bryan, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWindsor, Timothy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue11
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1202
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1209
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jclinepi.2003.11.011
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T08:04:25Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-9644295693
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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