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The phylogeny of Turnip mosaic virus ; comparisons of 38 genomic sequences reveal a Eurasian origin and a recent emergence in east Asia

Tomimura, Kenta; Gibbs, Adrian; Jenner, Carol; Walsh, John; Ohshima, Kazusato

Description

The genomes of a representative world-wide collection of 32 Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) isolates were sequenced and these, together with six previously reported sequences, were analysed. At least one-fifth of the sequences were recombinant. In phylogenetic analyses, using genomic sequences of Japanese yam mosaic virus as an outgroup, the TuMV sequences that did not show clear recombination formed a monophyletic group with four well-supported lineages. These groupings correlated with differences...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTomimura, Kenta
dc.contributor.authorGibbs, Adrian
dc.contributor.authorJenner, Carol
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, John
dc.contributor.authorOhshima, Kazusato
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:05:56Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T23:05:56Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-1083
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/85785
dc.description.abstractThe genomes of a representative world-wide collection of 32 Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) isolates were sequenced and these, together with six previously reported sequences, were analysed. At least one-fifth of the sequences were recombinant. In phylogenetic analyses, using genomic sequences of Japanese yam mosaic virus as an outgroup, the TuMV sequences that did not show clear recombination formed a monophyletic group with four well-supported lineages. These groupings correlated with differences in pathogenicity and provenance; the sister group to all others was of Eurasian B-strain isolates from non-brassicas, and probably represents the ancestral TuMV population, and the most recently 'emerged' branch of the population was probably that of the BR-strain isolates found only in east Asia. Eight isolates, all from east Asia, were clear recombinants, probably the progeny of recent recombination events, whereas a similar number, from other parts of the world, were seemingly older recombinants. This difference indicates that the presence of clear recombinants in a subpopulation may be a molecular signature of a recent 'emergence'.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceMolecular Ecology
dc.subjectKeywords: Amino Acid Sequence; Chromosome Mapping; Electrophoresis, Agar Gel; Evolution, Molecular; Genome; Geography; Molecular Sequence Data; Phylogeny; Potyvirus; Sequence Analysis, DNA; Brassica rapa subsp. rapa; Dioscorea alata; Dioscorea japonica; Japanese ya Breakpoints; Emergence; Evolution; Phylogeny; Recombination; Turnip mosaic virus
dc.titleThe phylogeny of Turnip mosaic virus ; comparisons of 38 genomic sequences reveal a Eurasian origin and a recent emergence in east Asia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume12
dc.date.issued2003
local.identifier.absfor060506 - Virology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub14442
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationTomimura, Kenta, National Research Institute of Brewing
local.contributor.affiliationGibbs, Adrian, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationJenner, Carol, Horticulture Research International
local.contributor.affiliationWalsh, John, Saga University
local.contributor.affiliationOhshima, Kazusato, Saga University
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2099
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2111
local.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-294X.2003.01881.x
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T08:03:01Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0042991439
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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