Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Begging to differ: scrubwren nestlings beg to alarm calls and vocalize when parents are absent

Maurer, Golo; Magrath, Robert D; Leonard, Marty; Horn, Andrew; Donnelly, Christine

Description

Nestling birds face a dilemma: they can increase parental provisioning by begging more intensively, but by doing so may also increase their risk of predation. Nestlings could deal with this dilemma by reducing begging intensity after parents have warned them of a nearby predator. We therefore tested experimentally whether nestling scrubwrens, Sericornis frontalis, increase begging intensity with hunger but reduce it after adult alarm calls. Single 5- and 8-day-old nestlings were temporarily...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMaurer, Golo
dc.contributor.authorMagrath, Robert D
dc.contributor.authorLeonard, Marty
dc.contributor.authorHorn, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:05:49Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T23:05:49Z
dc.identifier.issn0003-3472
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/85721
dc.description.abstractNestling birds face a dilemma: they can increase parental provisioning by begging more intensively, but by doing so may also increase their risk of predation. Nestlings could deal with this dilemma by reducing begging intensity after parents have warned them of a nearby predator. We therefore tested experimentally whether nestling scrubwrens, Sericornis frontalis, increase begging intensity with hunger but reduce it after adult alarm calls. Single 5- and 8-day-old nestlings were temporarily taken into the laboratory for playback experiments. Over a 90-min period of food deprivation we simulated parental visits every 10 min by playing back adult feeding calls. Hungrier nestlings begged louder and longer to simulated parental visits, but contrary to expectation did not beg less if they had previously heard playback of alarm calls, and even begged to the alarm calls themselves. The results were similar for both 'mobbing' and 'flee' alarm calls. Nestlings also gave distinctive calls in the 10-min interval between simulated parental visits, and the number of these calls increased with hunger and after playback of alarm calls. We suggest that nestlings acquire the ability to respond appropriately to alarm calls late in the nestling period and that therefore parents might be selected to avoid alarm calling when defending young nestlings.
dc.publisherAcademic Press
dc.sourceAnimal Behaviour
dc.subjectKeywords: alarm signal; avifauna; begging behavior; food provisioning; nestling; vocalization; Aves; Sericornis frontalis
dc.titleBegging to differ: scrubwren nestlings beg to alarm calls and vocalize when parents are absent
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume65
dc.date.issued2003
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub14340
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMaurer, Golo, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMagrath, Robert D, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLeonard, Marty, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHorn, Andrew, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDonnelly, Christine, Administrative Division, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1045
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1055
local.identifier.doi10.1006/anbe.2003.2148
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T08:02:26Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0038532461
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

There are no files associated with this item.


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator