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High levels of variability in immune response using antigens from two reproductive proteins in brushtail possums

Deakin, Janine; Belov, Katherine; Curach, Natalie C; Green, Peter; Cooper, Desmond W

Description

Immune-based fertility control is being considered as an effective long-term approach for controlling the pest brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) population in New Zealand. This relies heavily on the immune response of each immunised possum. A strong and lasting immune response in the majority of individuals in a population is essential. In this study, possums and the model macropod species, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) were immunised with either a luteinising hormone or androgen...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDeakin, Janine
dc.contributor.authorBelov, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorCurach, Natalie C
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Peter
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Desmond W
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:02:19Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T23:02:19Z
dc.identifier.issn1035-3712
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/84835
dc.description.abstractImmune-based fertility control is being considered as an effective long-term approach for controlling the pest brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) population in New Zealand. This relies heavily on the immune response of each immunised possum. A strong and lasting immune response in the majority of individuals in a population is essential. In this study, possums and the model macropod species, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) were immunised with either a luteinising hormone or androgen receptor synthetic peptide coupled to the carrier molecule KLH (keyhole limpet haemocyanin). The antibody response of wallabies to the antigens was relatively uniform. In contrast, the possum immunoglobulin response to both synthetic peptides and KLH was variable. The apparent high level of variation in the immune response of possums raises questions about the feasibility of using these two antigens to control possum numbers in New Zealand.
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.sourceWildlife Research
dc.subjectKeywords: immune response; integrated pest management; marsupial; pest control; sterilization; Australasia; Eastern Hemisphere; New Zealand; World; Alopias; Macropodidae; Macropus eugenii; Phalangeridae; Trichosurus vulpecula
dc.titleHigh levels of variability in immune response using antigens from two reproductive proteins in brushtail possums
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume32
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor060805 - Animal Neurobiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub13069
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDeakin, Janine, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBelov, Katherine, University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationCurach, Natalie C, Macquarie University
local.contributor.affiliationGreen, Peter, Macquarie University
local.contributor.affiliationCooper, Desmond W, Macquarie University
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage6
local.identifier.doi10.1071/WR03107
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T07:46:17Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-17544362639
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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