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Sexual conflict and cryptic female choice in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus

Bussiere, Luc; Hunt, John E; Jennions, Michael; Brooks, Rob

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The prevalence and evolutionary consequences of cryptic female choice (CFC) remain highly controversial, not least because the processes underlying its expression are often concealed within the female reproductive tract. However, even when female discrimination is relatively easy to observe, as in numerous insect species with externally attached spermatophores, it is often difficult to demonstrate directional CFC for certain male phenotypes over others. Using a biological assay to separate male...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBussiere, Luc
dc.contributor.authorHunt, John E
dc.contributor.authorJennions, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Rob
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:02:01Z
dc.identifier.issn0014-3820
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/84695
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence and evolutionary consequences of cryptic female choice (CFC) remain highly controversial, not least because the processes underlying its expression are often concealed within the female reproductive tract. However, even when female discrimination is relatively easy to observe, as in numerous insect species with externally attached spermatophores, it is often difficult to demonstrate directional CFC for certain male phenotypes over others. Using a biological assay to separate male crickets into attractive or unattractive categories, we demonstrate that females strongly discriminate against unattractive males by removing their spermatophores before insemination can be completed. This results in significantly more sperm being transferred by attractive males than unattractive males. Males respond to CFC by mate guarding females after copulation, which increases the spermatophore retention of both attractive and unattractive males. Interestingly, unattractive males who suffered earlier interruption of sperm transfer benefited more from mate guarding, and they guarded females more vigilantly than attractive males. Our results suggest that postcopulatory mate guarding has evolved via sexual conflict over insemination times rather than through genetic benefits of biasing paternity toward vigorous males, as has been previously suggested.
dc.publisherSociety for the Study of Evolution
dc.sourceEvolution
dc.subjectKeywords: bioassay; copulation; cricket; female; male; mate choice; mate guarding; phenotype; sexual conflict; spermatophore; Gryllidae; Insecta; Teleogryllus commodus; Teleogryllus oceanicus; sex pheromone; animal; article; artificial insemination; decision making Gryllidae; Indirect benefits; Postcopulatory choice; Sexual selection; Sperm choice; Sperm competition
dc.titleSexual conflict and cryptic female choice in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume60
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub12957
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBussiere, Luc, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationHunt, John E, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationJennions, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBrooks, Rob, University of New South Wales
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage792
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage800
local.identifier.doi10.1554/05-378.1
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T07:44:20Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33745264437
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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