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Modelling gambling time and economic assignments to weekly trip behaviour to gambling venues

Marshall, David; Baker, R G V

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The study of gambling and its socio-economic structures should be an area of growing interest to a society-relevant geography. In Australia, electronic gaming machines (EGMs) have dominated recent gambling industry growth. As EGMs have diffused through the urban hierarchy, there is a growing recognition that EGM distribution often correlates with levels of socio-economic status. Marshall and Baker (2002) showed that a similar EGM socio-economic assignment model evolved in the capital cities of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMarshall, David
dc.contributor.authorBaker, R G V
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T23:01:40Z
dc.identifier.issn1435-5930
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/84524
dc.description.abstractThe study of gambling and its socio-economic structures should be an area of growing interest to a society-relevant geography. In Australia, electronic gaming machines (EGMs) have dominated recent gambling industry growth. As EGMs have diffused through the urban hierarchy, there is a growing recognition that EGM distribution often correlates with levels of socio-economic status. Marshall and Baker (2002) showed that a similar EGM socio-economic assignment model evolved in the capital cities of Sydney and Melbourne, Australia, even though these cities have substantially different historical and legislative EGM environments. This paper looks at a related space-time model in the context of trip-making to gaming venues, relative to an Index of Economic Resources from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. A simulation of the model predicts different types of gambling behaviour. It also shows that venue hours can affect time-economic trip behaviour. The model is then applied to EGM gambling data gathered in an urban hierarchy on the north coast of New South Wales, Australia. The results define a gaussian-type low involvement 'recreational random' gambling for patrons, whereas for more involved gamblers (in terms of time spent gambling), there are discrete behavioural periods over the week for a wider economic cohort. This leads to the possibility of a spectrum of time-economic EGM gambling assignments for participating households in metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.sourceJournal of Geographical Systems: geographical information, analysis, theory and decision
dc.subjectKeywords: economic activity; gambling; modeling; time allocation; Australasia; Australia Gambling behaviour; Gambling involvement; Memoryless distributions; Time-economic modelling; Venue hours
dc.titleModelling gambling time and economic assignments to weekly trip behaviour to gambling venues
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume7
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor160499 - Human Geography not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub12810
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMarshall, David, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBaker, R G V, University of New England
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3-4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage381
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage402
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s10109-005-0003-8
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T07:41:40Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33644746357
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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