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Economic Voting and Electoral Behavior: How do individual, local, and national factors affect the partisan choice?

Leigh, Andrew

Description

What impact do income and other demographic factors have on a voter's partisan choice? Using post-election surveys of 14,000 voters in 10 Australian elections between 1966 and 2001, I explore the impact that individual, local, and national factors have on voters' decisions. In these 10 elections, the poor, foreign-born, younger voters, voters born since 1950, men, and those who are unmarried are more likely to be left-wing. Over the past 35 years, the partisan gap between men and women has...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLeigh, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:58:44Z
dc.identifier.issn0954-1985
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/83442
dc.description.abstractWhat impact do income and other demographic factors have on a voter's partisan choice? Using post-election surveys of 14,000 voters in 10 Australian elections between 1966 and 2001, I explore the impact that individual, local, and national factors have on voters' decisions. In these 10 elections, the poor, foreign-born, younger voters, voters born since 1950, men, and those who are unmarried are more likely to be left-wing. Over the past 35 years, the partisan gap between men and women has closed, but the partisan gap has widened on three dimensions: between young and old; between rich and poor; and between native-born and foreign-born. At a neighborhood level, I find that, controlling for a respondent's own characteristics, and instrumenting for neighborhood characteristics, voters who live in richer neighborhoods are more likely to be right-wing, while those in more ethnically diverse or unequal neighborhoods are more likely to be left-wing. Controlling for incumbency, macroeconomic factors do not seem to affect partisan preferences - Australian voters apparently regard both major parties as equally capable of governing in booms and busts.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceEconomics and Politics
dc.subjectKeywords: economic policy; neighborhood; party politics; political economy; voting behavior; Australasia; Australia; Eastern Hemisphere; World
dc.titleEconomic Voting and Electoral Behavior: How do individual, local, and national factors affect the partisan choice?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume17
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor149903 - Heterodox Economics
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub11712
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLeigh, Andrew, College of Business and Economics, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage265
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage296
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1468-0343.2005.00154.x
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T07:24:10Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-22444435569
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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