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Improving response rates to primary and supplementary questionnaires by changing response and instruction burden: cluster randomised trial

Phillips, Christine; Yates, Rachel; Glasgow, Nicholas; Ciszek, Karen; Attewell, Robyn

Description

Objective: Supplementary questionnaires provide additional information from subgroups, but may have an attritional effect on response rates. We examined the effects of different instruction methods on response rates to a two-part questionnaire. Methods: The ACT Kindergarten Health Survey comprises a health questionnaire for all school-entry children. A supplementary questionnaire targets children with respiratory symptoms. We cluster-randomised 109 schools in the ACT (4,494 children) to two...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Christine
dc.contributor.authorYates, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorGlasgow, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorCiszek, Karen
dc.contributor.authorAttewell, Robyn
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:58:14Z
dc.identifier.issn1326-0200
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/83377
dc.description.abstractObjective: Supplementary questionnaires provide additional information from subgroups, but may have an attritional effect on response rates. We examined the effects of different instruction methods on response rates to a two-part questionnaire. Methods: The ACT Kindergarten Health Survey comprises a health questionnaire for all school-entry children. A supplementary questionnaire targets children with respiratory symptoms. We cluster-randomised 109 schools in the ACT (4,494 children) to two instruction groups. Group 1 (instruction burden) had instructions to complete the supplementary questionnaire if certain questions in the primary questionnaire were answered. Group 2 (response burden) had instructions to complete both questionnaires irrespective of answers to the primary questionnaire. Results: Instructing all respondents to complete both questionnaires regardless of eligibility resulted in a statistically significantly lower primary questionnaire response rate (82% vs. 87%), but a statistically significantly higher response rate to the supplementary questionnaire (99% vs. 91%). The net effect was a small overall gain (82% vs. 79%) for the response burden group. Conclusion: Increasing the response burden had a minor impact on response rate to the primary questionnaire, but increased the response rate for most items to the supplementary questionnaire. Implications: Large surveys may be broken into primary and supplementary questionnaires, if strategies to maximise response rates are used. Questionnaires may need to be modified to take into account the likely attrition on response to either questionnaire resulting from instruction and response burdens.
dc.publisherPublic Health Association of Australia
dc.sourceAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
dc.subjectKeywords: antiasthmatic agent; article; asthma; childhood disease; cigarette smoking; clinical trial; cluster analysis; controlled clinical trial; controlled study; coughing; disease severity; drug delivery system; drug use; emergency health service; frequency anal
dc.titleImproving response rates to primary and supplementary questionnaires by changing response and instruction burden: cluster randomised trial
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume29
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor111704 - Community Child Health
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub11631
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPhillips, Christine, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationYates, Rachel, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGlasgow, Nicholas, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCiszek, Karen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAttewell, Robyn, Covance Pty Ltd
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage457
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage460
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T07:21:51Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-27544483789
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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