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The permeome of the malaria parasite: an overview of the membrane transport proteins of Plasmodium falciparum

Martin, Rowena; Henry, Roselani; Abbey, Janice; Clements, John D; Kirk, Kiaran

Description

BACKGROUND: The uptake of nutrients, expulsion of metabolic wastes and maintenance of ion homeostasis by the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite is mediated by membrane transport proteins. Proteins of this type are also implicated in the phenomenon of antimalarial drug resistance. However, the initial annotation of the genome of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum identified only a limited number of transporters, and no channels. In this study we have used a combination of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMartin, Rowena
dc.contributor.authorHenry, Roselani
dc.contributor.authorAbbey, Janice
dc.contributor.authorClements, John D
dc.contributor.authorKirk, Kiaran
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:57:59Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:57:59Z
dc.identifier.issn1474-7596
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/83219
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The uptake of nutrients, expulsion of metabolic wastes and maintenance of ion homeostasis by the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite is mediated by membrane transport proteins. Proteins of this type are also implicated in the phenomenon of antimalarial drug resistance. However, the initial annotation of the genome of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum identified only a limited number of transporters, and no channels. In this study we have used a combination of bioinformatic approaches to identify and attribute putative functions to transporters and channels encoded by the malaria parasite, as well as comparing expression patterns for a subset of these. RESULTS: A computer program that searches a genome database on the basis of the hydropathy plots of the corresponding proteins was used to identify more than 100 transport proteins encoded by P. falciparum. These include all the transporters previously annotated as such, as well as a similar number of candidate transport proteins that had escaped detection. Detailed sequence analysis enabled the assignment of putative substrate specificities and/or transport mechanisms to all those putative transport proteins previously without. The newly-identified transport proteins include candidate transporters for a range of organic and inorganic nutrients (including sugars, amino acids, nucleosides and vitamins), and several putative ion channels. The stage-dependent expression of RNAs for 34 candidate transport proteins of particular interest are compared. CONCLUSION: The malaria parasite possesses substantially more membrane transport proteins than was originally thought, and the analyses presented here provide a range of novel insights into the physiology of this important human pathogen.
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rightsCopyright Information: © 2005 Martin et al. licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use,
dc.sourceGenome Biology
dc.subjectKeywords: amino acid transporter; carrier protein; equilibrative nucleoside transporter; ion channel; protozoal protein; protozoal RNA; amino acid sequence; animal; article; biology; chemistry; erythrocyte; genetics; genomics; growth, development and aging; human;
dc.titleThe permeome of the malaria parasite: an overview of the membrane transport proteins of Plasmodium falciparum
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume6
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor060502 - Infectious Agents
local.identifier.absfor060110 - Receptors and Membrane Biology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub11441
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMartin, Rowena, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHenry, Roselani, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAbbey, Janice, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationClements, John D, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKirk, Kiaran, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpageR26
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:46:50Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-24144480800
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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