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International Migration and the Rainbow Nation

Lucas, David; Amoateng, Acheampong Yaw; Kalule-Sabiti, Ishmael

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Recent statistics suggest that emigration from South Africa is accelerating while documented immigration remains at low levels. Primary analysis of a 10% sample of the overseas-born in South Africa from the 1996 census confirmed that Black immigrants to South Africa were shown to be predominantly unskilled males, who were no better qualified than the Black population in general. This contrasts with the apartheid era when South Africa built up a stock of overseas-born skilled workers, mostly...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLucas, David
dc.contributor.authorAmoateng, Acheampong Yaw
dc.contributor.authorKalule-Sabiti, Ishmael
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:57:48Z
dc.identifier.issn1544-8444
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/83148
dc.description.abstractRecent statistics suggest that emigration from South Africa is accelerating while documented immigration remains at low levels. Primary analysis of a 10% sample of the overseas-born in South Africa from the 1996 census confirmed that Black immigrants to South Africa were shown to be predominantly unskilled males, who were no better qualified than the Black population in general. This contrasts with the apartheid era when South Africa built up a stock of overseas-born skilled workers, mostly Whites, which was not replenished in the 1990s, partly because of restrictive immigration policies. The UK is the major destination for S outh Africans but lacks detailed data on the characteristics of the immigrants. The second destination is Australia and New Zealand combined. Comparisons are made with published census data on the South Africa-born in Australia and New Zealand. A majority of emigrants have post-school qualifications and professional occupations, reflecting the selective immigration criteria of Australia and New Zealand. The analysis confirms the importance of human capital to potential emigrants even though they may wish to move for non-economic reasons. It also supports the view that South Africa had moved from a brain exchange of Whites to a brain drain, thus compounding a national shortage of skilled workers.
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Inc
dc.sourcePopulation Space and Place
dc.subjectKeywords: brain drain; emigration; international migration; labor migration; Africa; South Africa; Southern Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa Australia; Brain drain; Immigration; New Zealand; South Africa
dc.titleInternational Migration and the Rainbow Nation
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume12
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor160303 - Migration
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub11356
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLucas, David, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAmoateng, Acheampong Yaw, Human Sciences Research Council
local.contributor.affiliationKalule-Sabiti, Ishmael, University of the North West
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage45
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage63
local.identifier.doi10.1002/psp.391
dc.date.updated2015-12-12T07:18:50Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-31544479084
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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