Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Evaluating exotic predator control programs using non-invasive genetic tagging

Piggott, Maxine; wilson, Rebecca; Banks, Samuel; Marks, Clive A.; Gigliotti , Frank; Taylor, Andrea C.

Description

Carnivorous predators are difficult to detect using conventional survey methods, especially at low levels of abundance. The introduced red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Australia is monitored to determine the effectiveness of control programs, but assessing population parameters such as abundance and recruitment is difficult. We carried out a feasibility study to determine the effectiveness of using faecal DNA analysis methods to identify individual foxes and to assess abundance before and after...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPiggott, Maxine
dc.contributor.authorwilson, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorBanks, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorMarks, Clive A.
dc.contributor.authorGigliotti , Frank
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Andrea C.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:55:13Z
dc.identifier.issn1035-3712
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/82441
dc.description.abstractCarnivorous predators are difficult to detect using conventional survey methods, especially at low levels of abundance. The introduced red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Australia is monitored to determine the effectiveness of control programs, but assessing population parameters such as abundance and recruitment is difficult. We carried out a feasibility study to determine the effectiveness of using faecal DNA analysis methods to identify individual foxes and to assess abundance before and after lethal control. Fox faeces were collected in two sampling periods over four separate transects, and genotyped at five microsatellite loci. Two transects were subject to lethal control between collection periods. DNA was extracted from 170 fox faeces and, in total, 54 unique genotypes were identified. Fifteen biopsy genotypes from 30 foxes killed during lethal control were detected among the faecal genotypes. Overall, a similar number of genotypes were detected in both sampling periods. The number of individuals sampled in both periods was low (n≤6) and new individuals (n≤24) were detected in the second collection period. We were also able to detect animals that avoided lethal control, and movement of individuals between transects. The ability to identify individual foxes using these DNA techniques highlighted the shortcomings of the sample design, in particular the spatial scale and distances between transects. This study shows that non-invasive DNA sampling can provide valuable insight into pre and post fox abundance in relation to lethal control, individual behaviour and movement, as well as sample design. The information gained from this study will contribute to the design of future studies and, ultimately, control strategies.
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.sourceWildlife Research
dc.subjectKeywords: abundance; DNA; genotype; introduced species; mammal; predator control; transect; Animalia; Canidae; Vulpes; Vulpes vulpes
dc.titleEvaluating exotic predator control programs using non-invasive genetic tagging
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume35
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor050103 - Invasive Species Ecology
local.identifier.absfor050211 - Wildlife and Habitat Management
local.identifier.absfor060411 - Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB10694
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB1237
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPiggott, Maxine, Monash University
local.contributor.affiliationwilson, Rebecca, Department of Primary Industries (Victoria)
local.contributor.affiliationBanks, Samuel, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMarks, Clive A., Nocturnal Wildlife Research Pty Ltd
local.contributor.affiliationGigliotti , Frank , Primary Industries Research Victoria
local.contributor.affiliationTaylor, Andrea C., Monash University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue7
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage617
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage624
local.identifier.doi10.1071/WR08040
local.identifier.absseo960403 - Control of Animal Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland Environments
local.identifier.absseo960404 - Control of Animal Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Forest and Woodlands Environments
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:36:45Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-56649097480
local.identifier.thomsonID000260927200004
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Piggott_Evaluating_exotic_predator_2008.pdf119.39 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator