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What went and what came? Morbidity trends in general practice from the Netherlands

Schers, Henk; Bor, H.; Van Den Hoogen, H.; van Weel, Chris

Description

Background: Fourty years of morbidity registration in general practice is a milestone urging to present an overview of outcomes. This paper provides insight into the infrastructure and methods of the oldest practice-based research network in the Netherlands and offers an overview of morbidity in a general practice population. Changes in morbidity and some striking trends in morbidity are presented. Methods:The CMR (Continuous Morbidity Registration) collects morbidity data in four practices, in...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSchers, Henk
dc.contributor.authorBor, H.
dc.contributor.authorVan Den Hoogen, H.
dc.contributor.authorvan Weel, Chris
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:55:05Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:55:05Z
dc.identifier.issn1381-4788
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/82383
dc.description.abstractBackground: Fourty years of morbidity registration in general practice is a milestone urging to present an overview of outcomes. This paper provides insight into the infrastructure and methods of the oldest practice-based research network in the Netherlands and offers an overview of morbidity in a general practice population. Changes in morbidity and some striking trends in morbidity are presented. Methods:The CMR (Continuous Morbidity Registration) collects morbidity data in four practices, in and around Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The recording is anchored in the Dutch healthcare system, which is primary care based, and where every citizen is listed with a personal GP. Trends over the period 1985-2006 are presented as a three year moving average. As an indicator for 20-year prevalence trends we used the annual percentage change (APC). We restricted ourselves to morbidity, which is presented to the family physician on a frequent basis (overall prevalence rates <1.0/1000/year). Results: The age distribution of the CMR population is comparable to the general Dutch population. Overall incidence figures vary between 1500/ 1000 ptyrs (men) and 2000/1000 ptyrs (women). They are quite stable over the years, whereas overall prevalence figures are rising gradually to 1500/2500 ptyrs (men) and 2000/3500 ptyrs (women). Increase in prevalence rates for chronic conditions is diffuse and gradual with a few striking exceptions. Conclusion: For morbidity patterns, the CMR database serves as a mirror of general practice. Practice-based research networks are indispensable for the development and maintenance of general practice as an academic discipline.
dc.publisherMediselect B.V.
dc.sourceEuropean Journal of General Practice
dc.subjectKeywords: allergy; article; benign tumor; blood disease; cardiovascular disease; chronic disease; data base; demography; digestive system disease; endocrine disease; general practice; general practitioner; health care system; human; incidence; infection; malignant Incidence; Morbidity; Morbidity registration; Morbidity trends; Prevalence; Primary care
dc.titleWhat went and what came? Morbidity trends in general practice from the Netherlands
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume14
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor111700 - PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB10637
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSchers, Henk, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre
local.contributor.affiliationBor, H., Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre
local.contributor.affiliationVan Den Hoogen, H., Radboud University
local.contributor.affiliationVan Weel, Chris, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issueSUPPL. 1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage13
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage24
local.identifier.doi10.1080/13814780802436051
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:36:19Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-55049105115
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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