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Characteristics and harms associated with injecting versus smoking methamphetamine among methamphetamine treatment entrants

McKetin, Rebecca; Ross, Joanne; Kelly, Erin; Baker, Amanda L; Lee, Nicole; Lubman, Daniel; Mattick, Richard P

Description

Introduction and Aims. To compare the characteristics and harms associated with injecting and smoking methamphetamine among methamphetamine treatment entrants. Method and design. A structured face-to-face interview was used to assess demographics, drug use patterns and harms [physical and mental health, psychological distress, psychotic symptoms, crime and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviour] among 400 methamphetamine treatment entrants in Sydney and Brisbane, Australia....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMcKetin, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Joanne
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Erin
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Amanda L
dc.contributor.authorLee, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorLubman, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorMattick, Richard P
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:53:50Z
dc.identifier.issn0959-5236
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/81989
dc.description.abstractIntroduction and Aims. To compare the characteristics and harms associated with injecting and smoking methamphetamine among methamphetamine treatment entrants. Method and design. A structured face-to-face interview was used to assess demographics, drug use patterns and harms [physical and mental health, psychological distress, psychotic symptoms, crime and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviour] among 400 methamphetamine treatment entrants in Sydney and Brisbane, Australia. Participants who had injected but not smoked methamphetamine in the month before treatment (n=195, injectors) were compared to participants who had either: (a) injected and smoked (n=90, injectors who smoke), or (b) smoked but not injected (n=73, smokers), during this time. Results. In comparison with injectors, smokers were primarily non-injecting drug users, who were younger, more likely to be female and use ecstasy rather than heroin. After adjusting for these differences smokers were less dependent on methamphetamine than injectors, but they took the drug as often and had similarly high levels of psychological distress, poor physical and mental health, psychotic symptoms, sexual risk behaviour and criminal involvement. Injectors who smoked had a similar demographic and clinical profile to injectors, including comparable levels of needle sharing, but they used methamphetamine more often and had greater criminal involvement. Conclusion. Within this treatment sample, smoking methamphetamine occurred among both long-standing injecting drug users and a comparatively younger group of non-injecting drug users. It was associated with less severe methamphetamine dependence than injecting, but more intense use patterns and similar levels of other harms. [McKetin R, Ross J, Kelly E, Baker A, Lee N, Lubman DI, Mattick R. Characteristics and harms associated with injecting vs. smoking methamphetamine among methamphetamine treatment entrants. Drug Alcohol Rev 2008;27:277-285].
dc.publisherCarfax Publishing, Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceDrug and Alcohol Review
dc.subjectKeywords: 3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine; central stimulant agent; methamphetamine; street drug; adolescent; adult; age; article; Australia; comparative study; crime; disease transmission; drug abuse; female; heroin dependence; high risk behavior; human; Human i Injecting; Methamphetamine; Route of administration; Smoking; Substance use
dc.titleCharacteristics and harms associated with injecting versus smoking methamphetamine among methamphetamine treatment entrants
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume27
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB10292
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMcKetin, Rebecca, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRoss, Joanne, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationKelly, Erin, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationBaker, Amanda L, University of Newcastle
local.contributor.affiliationLee, Nicole, Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre
local.contributor.affiliationLubman, Daniel, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationMattick, Richard P, University of New South Wales
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage277
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage285
local.identifier.doi10.1080/09595230801919486
local.identifier.absseo920414 - Substance Abuse
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T11:00:06Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-41549135639
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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