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Sustainable development in the indigenous-owned savanna: Innovative institutional design for cooperative wildlife management

Altman, Jon; Cochrane, Michelle

Description

This study examines a particular form of cooperative wildlife management on Aboriginal land in the tropical savanna of the Northern Territory of Australia, in the context of broader questions about governance. It asks how governance at the local or community level can be designed to ensure sustainable development and real economic benefit for the region's long-term indigenous residents. It is argued here that sustainable development will require hybrid institutions that accommodate and value...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorAltman, Jon
dc.contributor.authorCochrane, Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:53:45Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:53:45Z
dc.identifier.issn1035-3712
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/81948
dc.description.abstractThis study examines a particular form of cooperative wildlife management on Aboriginal land in the tropical savanna of the Northern Territory of Australia, in the context of broader questions about governance. It asks how governance at the local or community level can be designed to ensure sustainable development and real economic benefit for the region's long-term indigenous residents. It is argued here that sustainable development will require hybrid institutions that accommodate and value the principles and practices of indigenous resource management, while also recognising the benefits of broader regional resource governance. Emerging best practice in wildlife harvesting that is founded on careful scientific assessments of sustainability is identified, and an approach to northern development based on sustainability and locally controlled commercialisation is canvassed. Future challenges to the proposed approach include convincing governments and state agencies of its national as well as regional benefits. Reform of governance to facilitate its rapid implementation is desirable, in the context of the relative poverty currently experienced by many indigenous people in tropical north Australia.
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.sourceWildlife Research
dc.subjectKeywords: harvesting; savanna; sustainable development; wildlife management; Australasia; Australia; Eastern Hemisphere; Northern Territory; World
dc.titleSustainable development in the indigenous-owned savanna: Innovative institutional design for cooperative wildlife management
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume32
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor050209 - Natural Resource Management
local.identifier.absfor169902 - Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub10251
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationAltman, Jon, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCochrane, Michelle, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage473
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage80
local.identifier.doi10.1071/WR04074
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:59:27Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-25144475503
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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