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Stability and predictability of the classification of mild cognitive impairment as assessed by episodic memory test performance over time

de Jager, Celeste A; Budge, Marc

Description

This study aimed to address the criteria and the stability of the classification of MCI. The Foresight Challenge cohort of 157 community-dwelling volunteers was assessed on 3 visits at 2-year intervals with episodic, semantic and working memory tests. Subjective memory complaints were assessed with the CAMDEX. Of the cohort, 2% had dementia and 31% were classified with MCI at visit 3, 43% with stable impairment from Time 1. Thirteen percent of those with objective memory impairment at Time 1 or...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorde Jager, Celeste A
dc.contributor.authorBudge, Marc
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:53:29Z
dc.identifier.issn1355-4795
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/81834
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed to address the criteria and the stability of the classification of MCI. The Foresight Challenge cohort of 157 community-dwelling volunteers was assessed on 3 visits at 2-year intervals with episodic, semantic and working memory tests. Subjective memory complaints were assessed with the CAMDEX. Of the cohort, 2% had dementia and 31% were classified with MCI at visit 3, 43% with stable impairment from Time 1. Thirteen percent of those with objective memory impairment at Time 1 or 2 improved to control status by Time 3. Episodic memory tests were predictive for MCI at all timepoints, as were tests for praxis and Graded Naming, while at Time 3 spatial span lost predictive value, but processing speed became predictive. Decline in processing speed was seen in control and MCI groups, while memory performance and MMSE decline occurred only in the MCI group. The use of combined memory test scores gave better sensitivity to MCI than single tests. Subjective memory complaints were positive for 79% of the MCI group and 62.5% of controls. These findings would suggest consideration of modification of current MCI criteria.
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceNeurocase
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; aged; ambulatory care; article; cognitive defect; cohort analysis; community; controlled study; dementia; disease classification; disease course; disease severity; functional assessment; human; intermethod comparison; major clinical study; memory d
dc.titleStability and predictability of the classification of mild cognitive impairment as assessed by episodic memory test performance over time
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume11
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor110308 - Geriatrics and Gerontology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub10144
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationde Jager, Celeste A, University of Oxford
local.contributor.affiliationBudge, Marc, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage72
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage79
local.identifier.doi10.1080/13554790490896820
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:56:46Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-14944370011
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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