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Islam and Marble from the Origins to Saddam Hussein

Greenhalgh, Michael

Description

This monograph stems from a long-standing interest in the re-use of Roman antiquities during the Middle Ages and later in the West. While such antiquities—spolia—were sometimes to be found close at hand, it is often evident that the artifacts came from afar, usually in Roman times, but sometimes transported on (for example) Venetian or Pisan galleys. Comparing maps of the Mediterranean during the Roman and mediaeval centuries, and studying (scarce) mediaeval accounts of how they collected...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGreenhalgh, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:53:21Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:53:21Z
dc.identifier.isbn0731546369
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/81770
dc.description.abstractThis monograph stems from a long-standing interest in the re-use of Roman antiquities during the Middle Ages and later in the West. While such antiquities—spolia—were sometimes to be found close at hand, it is often evident that the artifacts came from afar, usually in Roman times, but sometimes transported on (for example) Venetian or Pisan galleys. Comparing maps of the Mediterranean during the Roman and mediaeval centuries, and studying (scarce) mediaeval accounts of how they collected spolia makes it clear that any study must range much further than the Italian peninsula, not least to Byzantium. But maps show that a large proportion of once-Roman sites in North Africa, Spain and Syria, and then increasingly in Anatolia and the homelands of Byzantium, were under Islamic control. Indeed, a quick survey of early Islamic monuments demonstrates a devotion to marble spolia at least as profound as that in the Christian West or Byzantine East. Clearly, then, any consideration of mediaeval re-use of the antique architectural heritage (of which much more survived then than now) has to look at Islam as well as at Byzantium. Taking such a broad perspective of this once-Roman “lake”, it is nonsense to write of the ramifications of the “classical tradition” without considering how Islam dealt with the gifts of Hellenism and of Romanitas—the more so because there is evidence that Muslims and Christians competed for the best pieces, which became ever scarcer as the centuries passed. In what follows, while heartened by a broad range of translations into European languages, I am hampered by my lack of Arabic or Turkish; archives and books in both languages surely have much to offer in this area. As Franz Rosenthal wrote (1968, VII), this work represents the very imperfect execution of what I feel was a very good intention.
dc.format.extent99 pages
dc.publisherCanberra, ACT: The Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies, Faculty of Arts, The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCentre for Arab and Islamic Studies(CAIS) Monograph
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.rightsAuthor retains copyright
dc.titleIslam and Marble from the Origins to Saddam Hussein
dc.typeBook
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor210310 - Middle Eastern and African History
local.identifier.absfor120103 - Architectural History and Theory
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub10075
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGreenhalgh, Michael, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:55:50Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCanberra, Australia
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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