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Unwelcome Guests: Relations between internally displaced persons and their hosts in North Sulawesi, Indonesia

Duncan, Christopher

Description

This article looks at the deteriorating relations between the local population of North Sulawesi in eastern Indonesia and the approximately 35,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) who fled there from the neighbouring province of North Maluku. These IDPs fled to North Sulawesi during a period of communal violence in North Maluku that lasted from late 1999 until mid-2000. Although initial relations between the two groups were positive, the extended presence of 35,000 IDPs created several...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:50:49Z
dc.identifier.issn1471-6925
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/80972
dc.description.abstractThis article looks at the deteriorating relations between the local population of North Sulawesi in eastern Indonesia and the approximately 35,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) who fled there from the neighbouring province of North Maluku. These IDPs fled to North Sulawesi during a period of communal violence in North Maluku that lasted from late 1999 until mid-2000. Although initial relations between the two groups were positive, the extended presence of 35,000 IDPs created several problems, including a decrease in wages and an increase in housing costs. Negative perceptions of IDPs and jealousy over aid led to further misunderstandings. In a similar vein, IDP experiences with civil servants and other locals led them to distrust the host population. I examine how the government's labelling of the displaced as IDPs influenced the dynamic between them and locals. This process of labelling differentiated the IDPs from other migrants to the region. Furthermore, the IDP-centric focus on handling the displaced failed to take into account the social context in which they lived and exacerbated tensions with host communities. The article ends with an examination of efforts made by local and international NGOs to address these tensions, as well as concerns about the possibilities for future conflict.
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.sourceJournal of Refugee Studies
dc.subjectKeywords: cultural relations; nongovernmental organization; refugee; Asia; Eastern Hemisphere; Eurasia; Greater Sunda Islands; Malay Archipelago; Southeast Asia; Sulawesi; Sunda Isles; World
dc.titleUnwelcome Guests: Relations between internally displaced persons and their hosts in North Sulawesi, Indonesia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume18
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor160104 - Social and Cultural Anthropology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub9282
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDuncan, Christopher, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage25
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage46
local.identifier.doi10.1093/jrs/18.1.25
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:42:28Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-26844555314
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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