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Advancing breeding phenology in response to environmental change in a wild red deer population

Moyes, Kelly; Nussey, Daniel H.; Clements, Michelle N.; Guinness, Fiona E.; Morris, Alison; Morris, Sean; Pemberton, Josephine M; Kruuk, Loeske; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

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Most evidence for advances in phenology of in response to recent climate warming in wild vertebrate populations has come from long-term studies of birds. Few studies have either documented phenological advances or tested their climatic causes and demographic consequences in wild mammal systems. Using a long-term study of red deer on the Isle of Rum, Scotland, we present evidence of significant temporal trends in six phenological traits: oestrus date and parturition date in females, and antler...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMoyes, Kelly
dc.contributor.authorNussey, Daniel H.
dc.contributor.authorClements, Michelle N.
dc.contributor.authorGuinness, Fiona E.
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Alison
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Sean
dc.contributor.authorPemberton, Josephine M
dc.contributor.authorKruuk, Loeske
dc.contributor.authorClutton-Brock, Tim H
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:50:09Z
dc.identifier.issn1354-1013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/80674
dc.description.abstractMost evidence for advances in phenology of in response to recent climate warming in wild vertebrate populations has come from long-term studies of birds. Few studies have either documented phenological advances or tested their climatic causes and demographic consequences in wild mammal systems. Using a long-term study of red deer on the Isle of Rum, Scotland, we present evidence of significant temporal trends in six phenological traits: oestrus date and parturition date in females, and antler cast date, antler clean date, rut start date and rut end date in males. These traits advanced by between 5 and 12 days across a 28-year study period. Local climate measures associated with plant growth in spring and summer (growing degree days) increased significantly over time and explained a significant amount of variation in all six phenological traits, largely accounting for temporal advances observed in some of the traits. However, there was no evidence for temporal changes in key female reproductive performance traits (offspring birth weight and offspring survival) in this population, despite significant relationships between these traits and female phenology. In males, average antler weights increased over time presumably as a result of improved resource availability and physiological condition through spring and summer. There was no evidence for any temporal change in average male annual breeding success, as might be expected if the timing of male rutting behaviour was failing to track advances in the timing of oestrus in females. Our results provide rare evidence linking phenological advances to climate warming in a wild mammal and highlight the potential complexity of relationships between climate warming, phenology and demography in wild vertebrates.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceGlobal Change Biology
dc.subjectKeywords: climate change; deer; demographic trend; ecosystem response; environmental change; growth response; phenology; plant; reproductive behavior; rutting; temporal variation; trend analysis; vegetation dynamics; warming; Hebrides; Highland; Inner Hebrides; Rum Climate warming; Demography; Mammal; Phenology; Plant growth; Reproductive fitness; Sexual selection; Ungulate
dc.titleAdvancing breeding phenology in response to environmental change in a wild red deer population
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume17
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor060306 - Evolutionary Impacts of Climate Change
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB8937
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMoyes, Kelly, University of Cambridge
local.contributor.affiliationNussey, Daniel H., University of Edinburgh
local.contributor.affiliationClements, Michelle N., University of Edinburgh
local.contributor.affiliationGuinness, Fiona E., University of Cambridge
local.contributor.affiliationMorris, Alison, University of Edinburgh
local.contributor.affiliationMorris, Sean, Scottish Natural Heritage
local.contributor.affiliationPemberton, Josephine M, University of Edinburgh
local.contributor.affiliationKruuk, Loeske, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationClutton-Brock, Tim H, University of Cambridge
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue7
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2455
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2469
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2486.2010.02382.x
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:44:34Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-79957859816
local.identifier.thomsonID000291221000015
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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