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Control strategies for Q fever based on results of pre-vaccination screening in Victoria, 1988 to 2001

Greig, Jane; Patel, Mahomed; Clements, Mark; Taylor, N Kathleen

Description

Objective: Data from Q fever pre-vaccination screening were analysed to determine the level of agreement between the two tests of immunity and between disease or vaccination history and immunity, trends in proportion of participants immune to Q fever, and the annual risk of infection. Method: Data from nearly 10,000 screening episodes between July 1988 and June 2001 on Victorian workers at high risk were assessed. Results: Most participants were male (86%) and employed in Victorian abattoirs...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGreig, Jane
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Mahomed
dc.contributor.authorClements, Mark
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, N Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:49:24Z
dc.identifier.issn1326-0200
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/80528
dc.description.abstractObjective: Data from Q fever pre-vaccination screening were analysed to determine the level of agreement between the two tests of immunity and between disease or vaccination history and immunity, trends in proportion of participants immune to Q fever, and the annual risk of infection. Method: Data from nearly 10,000 screening episodes between July 1988 and June 2001 on Victorian workers at high risk were assessed. Results: Most participants were male (86%) and employed in Victorian abattoirs (81%). Agreement between results of tests for immunity was 'fair' (κ=0.52). Self-reported history of vaccination or infection was a poor predictor of immunity. The proportion of positive blood and skin tests increased with years of exposure to animals/meat, but decreased over the 13-year period with shorter exposures. Hence the percentage requiring vaccination increased from 50% in 1998 to 90% in 2001. The average annual risk of infection among abattoir workers was 45.0 per 1,000 (95% CI 42.3-47.6), and 62.6 per 1,000 (95% CI 57.5-67.7) over the first 10 years of exposure. Conclusions: This is the first Australian study to estimate the annual risk of Q fever infection in abattoir workers. The study confirmed previous findings of poor agreement between screening tests and predictive value of history of vaccination/exposure. Up to 90% of new entrants in high-risk workplaces will be susceptible to Q fever and require vaccination. Implications: Systematic post-marketing surveillance is needed to monitor adverse events to the vaccine, duration of protection and possible reasons for vaccine failures.
dc.publisherPublic Health Association of Australia
dc.sourceAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
dc.subjectKeywords: Q fever vaccine; q vax; adolescent; adult; aged; article; Australia; confidence interval; controlled study; Coxiella burnetii; female; high risk population; human; infection risk; major clinical study; male; mass immunization; mass screening; occupational
dc.titleControl strategies for Q fever based on results of pre-vaccination screening in Victoria, 1988 to 2001
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume29
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub8793
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGreig, Jane, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPatel, Mahomed, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationClements, Mark, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationTaylor, N Kathleen, VIC Department of Human Services
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage53
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage57
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:35:06Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-15044349623
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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