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Flammability of Australian forests

Gill, A Malcom; Zylstra, Phil

Description

'Flammability' means different things to different people. Scientifically, it can be defined through three component variables that describe how well the fuel ignites (ignitibility), how well it burns (combustibility) and how long it burns (sustainability). The 'fuel' may be a plant organ, a whole plant or a plant community. While the terms ignitibility, combustibility and sustainability have been developed for laboratory studies, there are conceptual equivalents suited to the field; these are...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGill, A Malcom
dc.contributor.authorZylstra, Phil
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:49:20Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-9158
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/80494
dc.description.abstract'Flammability' means different things to different people. Scientifically, it can be defined through three component variables that describe how well the fuel ignites (ignitibility), how well it burns (combustibility) and how long it burns (sustainability). The 'fuel' may be a plant organ, a whole plant or a plant community. While the terms ignitibility, combustibility and sustainability have been developed for laboratory studies, there are conceptual equivalents suited to the field; these are rate of spread, intensity and residence times. Another variable is added for field circumstances - probability of burning at a point. Eucalypt forests can be highly 'flammable' even considering all criteria and scales, while Australian forests in general show the whole range of variation from low ('closed forests' or 'rainforests') to high (e.g. relatively short stringy-barked open forests of Eucalyptus with abundant wiregrass). The expression of flammability depends on the local circumstances. In the field this can be summarised in terms of weather, terrain and ignition. Predicting how much potential forest fuel, and the attributes of that fuel, will be involved at any particular time, and under extreme weather conditions, remains a challenge. How social, climatic and fuel-species' changes will affect flammability, directly and indirectly, in the next 50-100 y is uncertain but potentially very significant.
dc.publisherInstitute of Foresters of Australia
dc.sourceAustralian Forestry
dc.subjectKeywords: Combustion; Fires; Flammability; Fuel consumption; Fuels; Mathematical models; Probability; Fire behavior; Fuel appraisals; Fuel species; Ignitibility; Forestry; Australia; Combustion; Fires; Flammability; Forests; Fuels; Mathematical Models; Probability; Australia; Combustion; Fire behaviour; Forests; Fuel appraisals; Fuel consumption; Models
dc.titleFlammability of Australian forests
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume68
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor070503 - Forestry Fire Management
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub8760
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGill, A Malcom, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationZylstra, Phil, CSIRO Division of Plant Industry
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage87
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage93
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:34:20Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-23844438715
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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