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US-China relations after 11 September: a long engagement or marriage of convenience?

Taylor, Brendan

Description

This article traces the evolution of US - Sino relations in the period since the 11 September attacks on the World Trade Centre and the Pentagon. It argues that the resultant, largely unanticipated rapprochement that has occurred between Beijing and Washington is actually more robust than many analysts have thus far been prepared to acknowledge. While conflictual elements will remain a feature of this all-important bilateral relationship, the article contends that the current 'honeymoon period'...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Brendan
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:45:46Z
dc.identifier.issn1035-7718
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/79946
dc.description.abstractThis article traces the evolution of US - Sino relations in the period since the 11 September attacks on the World Trade Centre and the Pentagon. It argues that the resultant, largely unanticipated rapprochement that has occurred between Beijing and Washington is actually more robust than many analysts have thus far been prepared to acknowledge. While conflictual elements will remain a feature of this all-important bilateral relationship, the article contends that the current 'honeymoon period' in US - Sino relations is likely to persist for some time yet, largely because it is underwritten by a deeper combination of economic, political and strategic considerations. While recognising that it is both natural and necessary to contemplate the 'worst of times' that may still lie ahead in US - Sino relations, the article concludes that it is particularly important for Australian policymakers to acknowledge the potential for a prolongation of the post-11 September 'honeymoon' and to actively encourage this possibility as they contemplate alternative approaches to managing China's rise.
dc.publisherCarfax Publishing, Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of International Affairs
dc.subjectKeywords: geopolitics; international relations; terrorism; World Trade Center; Asia; China; Eastern Hemisphere; Eurasia; Far East; North America; United States; Western Hemisphere; World
dc.titleUS-China relations after 11 September: a long engagement or marriage of convenience?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume59
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor160604 - Defence Studies
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub8299
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationTaylor, Brendan, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage179
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage199
local.identifier.doi10.1080/10357710500134483
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:25:06Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-21244479669
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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