Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Variable responses of skinks to a common history of rainforest fluctuation: Concordance between phylogeography and palaeo-distribution models

Moussalli, Adnan; Williams, Stephen E.; Carnaval, Ana Carolina; Moritz, Craig

Description

There is a growing appreciation of impacts of late-Quaternary climate fluctuations on spatial patterns of species and genetic diversity. A major challenge is to understand how and why species respond individualistically to a common history of climate-induced habitat fluctuation. Here, we combine modelling of palaeo-distributions and mitochondrial-DNA phylogeographies to compare spatial patterns of population persistence and isolation across three species of rainforest skinks (Saproscincus spp.)...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMoussalli, Adnan
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Stephen E.
dc.contributor.authorCarnaval, Ana Carolina
dc.contributor.authorMoritz, Craig
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:45:25Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-1083
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/79765
dc.description.abstractThere is a growing appreciation of impacts of late-Quaternary climate fluctuations on spatial patterns of species and genetic diversity. A major challenge is to understand how and why species respond individualistically to a common history of climate-induced habitat fluctuation. Here, we combine modelling of palaeo-distributions and mitochondrial-DNA phylogeographies to compare spatial patterns of population persistence and isolation across three species of rainforest skinks (Saproscincus spp.) with varying climatic preferences. Using Akaike Information Criterion model-averaged projections, all three species are predicted to have maintained one or more small populations in the northern Wet Tropics, multiple or larger populations in the central region, and few if any in the south. For the high-elevation species, Saproscincus czechurai, the warm-wet climate of the mid Holocene was most restrictive, whereas for the generalist S. basiliscus and lower-elevation S. tetradactyla, the cool-dry last glacial maximum was most restrictive. As expected, S. czechurai was the most genetically structured species, although relative to modelled distributions, S. basiliscus had surprisingly deep phylogeographical structure among southern rainforest isolates, implying long-term isolation and persistence. For both S. basiliscus and S. tetradactyla, there was high genetic diversity and complex phylogeographical patterns in the central Wet Tropics, reflecting persistence of large, structured populations. A previously identified vicariant barrier separating northern and central regions is supported, and results from these species also emphasize a historical persistence of populations south of another biogeographical break, the Tully Gorge. Overall, the results support the contention that in a topographically heterogeneous landscape, species with broader climatic niches may maintain higher and more structured genetic diversity due to persistence through varying climates.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceMolecular Ecology
dc.subjectKeywords: mitochondrial DNA; adaptation; animal; article; biological model; classification; ecosystem; evolution; genetics; geography; lizard; phylogeny; population genetics; tree; tropic climate; Adaptation, Physiological; Animals; DNA, Mitochondrial; Ecosystem; E Palaeo-distribution; Palaeoclimate; Phylogeography; Pleistocene refugia; Tropical rainforest
dc.titleVariable responses of skinks to a common history of rainforest fluctuation: Concordance between phylogeography and palaeo-distribution models
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume18
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor060399 - Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB8145
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMoussalli, Adnan, University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationMoritz, Craig, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWilliams, Stephen E., James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationCarnaval, Ana Carolina, University of California
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage483
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage499
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.04035.x
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:39:53Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-58549086994
local.identifier.thomsonID000262517400008
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Moussalli_Variable_responses_of_skinks_2009.pdf632.96 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator