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Late Miocene vegetation and palaeoenvironments of the Drygalski Formation, Heard Island, Indian Ocean: evidence from palynology

Truswell, Elizabeth; Quilty, Patrick G; McMinn, A; Macphail, Michael; Wheller, G E

Description

Well sorted, fine lithic sandstone within the Drygalski Formation at Cape Lockyer on the southern tip of Heard Island, preserves a diverse terrestrial palynoflora as well as marine diatoms and a few foraminifera. A combination of these elements suggests a Late Miocene age (10-5 Ma). The palaeovegetation was markedly different from that presently on the island, and appears to comprise at least two ecologically distinct communities: open heath or herbfield dominated by grasses and Asteraceae, and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTruswell, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorQuilty, Patrick G
dc.contributor.authorMcMinn, A
dc.contributor.authorMacphail, Michael
dc.contributor.authorWheller, G E
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:45:24Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:45:24Z
dc.identifier.issn0954-1020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/79757
dc.description.abstractWell sorted, fine lithic sandstone within the Drygalski Formation at Cape Lockyer on the southern tip of Heard Island, preserves a diverse terrestrial palynoflora as well as marine diatoms and a few foraminifera. A combination of these elements suggests a Late Miocene age (10-5 Ma). The palaeovegetation was markedly different from that presently on the island, and appears to comprise at least two ecologically distinct communities: open heath or herbfield dominated by grasses and Asteraceae, and a more mesophytic community dominated by ferns but also including lycopods and angiosperms such as Gunnera. This may have represented a coastal flora similar to the 'fern-bush' community that exists now on Southern Ocean islands north of the Antarctic Polar Frontal Zone, and in Tierra del Fuego; however, there is no evidence of tree species in the local flora and trace amounts of tree pollen present may have blown in from other landmasses in the region.
dc.publisherBritish Antarctic Survey
dc.sourceAntarctic Science
dc.subjectKeywords: Miocene; paleoenvironment; palynology; vegetation; Heard Island; Heard Island and McDonald Islands; Indian Ocean; Indian Ocean islands; oceanic regions; World; Asteraceae; Bacillariophyta; Filicophyta; Foraminifera; Gunnera; Lycopodium; Magnoliophyta; Nit Cape Lockyer; Kerguelen Plateau; Microfossils; Miocene diatoms; Southern Ocean; Sub-Antarctic; Vegetation history
dc.titleLate Miocene vegetation and palaeoenvironments of the Drygalski Formation, Heard Island, Indian Ocean: evidence from palynology
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume17
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor060206 - Palaeoecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub8140
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationTruswell, Elizabeth, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationQuilty, Patrick G, University of Tasmania
local.contributor.affiliationMcMinn, A, University of Tasmania
local.contributor.affiliationMacphail, Michael, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWheller, G E, Volcanex International Pty Ltd
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage427
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage442
local.identifier.doi10.1017/S0954102005002865
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:21:23Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-24644456513
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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