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Job Strain, Job Insecurity, and Health: Rethinking the Relationship

Strazdins, Lyndall; D'Souza, Rennie; Lim, Lynette; Broom, Dorothy; Rodgers, Bryan

Description

Job strain (high demands and low control) is a widely used measure of work stress. The authors introduce a new way of looking at work stress by combining job strain with job insecurity, a combination increasingly prevalent in contemporary economies, using data from a cross-sectional survey (N = 1,188) of mid-aged Australian managers and professionals. Those reporting both strain and insecurity showed markedly higher odds for mental and physical health problems (depression: odds ratio [OR]...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorStrazdins, Lyndall
dc.contributor.authorD'Souza, Rennie
dc.contributor.authorLim, Lynette
dc.contributor.authorBroom, Dorothy
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Bryan
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:45:13Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:45:13Z
dc.identifier.issn1076-8998
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/79657
dc.description.abstractJob strain (high demands and low control) is a widely used measure of work stress. The authors introduce a new way of looking at work stress by combining job strain with job insecurity, a combination increasingly prevalent in contemporary economies, using data from a cross-sectional survey (N = 1,188) of mid-aged Australian managers and professionals. Those reporting both strain and insecurity showed markedly higher odds for mental and physical health problems (depression: odds ratio [OR] 13.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.67-34.01; anxiety: OR 12.88, CI 5.12-32.39; physical health problems: OR 3.97, CI 1.72-9.16; and poor self-rated health: OR 7.12, CI 2.81-18.01). Job strain and insecurity showed synergistic associations with health, and employees experiencing both could be at heightened health risk.
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Society
dc.sourceJournal of Occupational Health Psychology
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; anxiety disorder; article; comparative study; controlled study; demography; depression; female; health hazard; health survey; human; male; manager; model; occupational health; priority journal; work; worker; Adult; Data Collection; Employment; Fema
dc.titleJob Strain, Job Insecurity, and Health: Rethinking the Relationship
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume9
dc.date.issued2004
local.identifier.absfor111705 - Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub8048
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationStrazdins, Lyndall, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationD'Souza, Rennie, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLim, Lynette, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBroom, Dorothy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRodgers, Bryan, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage296
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage305
local.identifier.doi10.1037/1076-8998.9.4.296
local.identifier.absseo920505 - Occupational Health
local.identifier.absseo920412 - Preventive Medicine
local.identifier.absseo920599 - Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:49:34Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-7944233221
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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