Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Dynamic refugia and species persistence: Tracking spatial shifts in habitat through time

Graham, Catherine H.; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Phillips, Steven J.; Williams, Stephen E.; Moritz, Craig

Description

Historical climate is known to influence contemporary patterns of biological diversity. Species distribution modeling methods, combined with paleoclimatic surfaces, have been used to identify regions that were likely stable across long periods of time. To date, this approach has produced a static representation of refugia by identifying regions of suitable climate across a series of time-slices. However, suitable habitat for a given species (or suite of species) may have shifted contiguously in...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGraham, Catherine H.
dc.contributor.authorVanDerWal, Jeremy
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Steven J.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Stephen E.
dc.contributor.authorMoritz, Craig
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:45:12Z
dc.identifier.issn0906-7590
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/79652
dc.description.abstractHistorical climate is known to influence contemporary patterns of biological diversity. Species distribution modeling methods, combined with paleoclimatic surfaces, have been used to identify regions that were likely stable across long periods of time. To date, this approach has produced a static representation of refugia by identifying regions of suitable climate across a series of time-slices. However, suitable habitat for a given species (or suite of species) may have shifted contiguously in response to changing climates through geologic time. We develop a new approach that takes into consideration habitat connectivity through time. We use the Australian Wet Tropics as a case study to demonstrate how our method works and suggest additional insights the method might give for understanding the determinants of biological diversity.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceEcography
dc.subjectKeywords: biodiversity; climate change; habitat type; numerical model; paleoclimate; physiological response; population distribution; population dynamics; refugium; spatial analysis; Australia
dc.titleDynamic refugia and species persistence: Tracking spatial shifts in habitat through time
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume33
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor060302 - Biogeography and Phylogeography
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB8045
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGraham, Catherine H., Stony Brook University
local.contributor.affiliationVanDerWal, Jeremy, James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationPhillips, Steven J., AT&T Labs-Research
local.contributor.affiliationMoritz, Craig, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWilliams, Stephen E., James Cook University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1062
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1069
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0587.2010.06430.x
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:39:19Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-78650386746
local.identifier.thomsonID000285755100008
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Graham_Dynamic_refugia_and_species_2010.pdf293.92 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator