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Childhood adversity in an Australian population

Rosenman, Stephen; Rodgers, Bryan

Description

Background. The impact of adversity in childhood is well established in clinical populations, but there is little information about adversity in wider populations. The aim of this paper is to report and to explore the distribution of childhood family adversity in an Australian population. Method. A total of 7485 randomly selected subjects in 20-24, 40-44 and 60-64 year age bands were interviewed at the outset of a longitudinal community study of psychological health in the Canberra region of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRosenman, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Bryan
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:44:57Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:44:57Z
dc.identifier.issn0933-7954
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/79539
dc.description.abstractBackground. The impact of adversity in childhood is well established in clinical populations, but there is little information about adversity in wider populations. The aim of this paper is to report and to explore the distribution of childhood family adversity in an Australian population. Method. A total of 7485 randomly selected subjects in 20-24, 40-44 and 60-64 year age bands were interviewed at the outset of a longitudinal community study of psychological health in the Canberra region of Australia. In the initial cross-sectional interview, subjects answered 17 questions about experience of adversity in the home to age 16 years. Results. In the population, 59.5% had experienced some form of childhood adversity and 37% had experienced more than one adversity. Domestic conflict and parental psychopathology and substance use are the common adversities. Parental sexual abuse was reported by 1.1%. Adversity was highest in the 40-44 year age group and reported more in women in all age groups. The majority of subjects saw their childhood as happy or normal despite adversity, but happiness is affected most by domestic warmth and harmony, and normalcy by abuse and neglect. Severe adversities, physical and sexual abuse and neglect, were uncommon, but were related to multiple and other severe adversities. Conclusion. Some form of adversity is a common experience, although the severest abuses are less common in this population. Multiple adversities are common and only a minority experience single adversities. Physical abuse, sexual abuse and neglect rarely occur alone, but indicate a context of abuse.
dc.publisherDr Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag
dc.sourceSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
dc.subjectKeywords: adolescent; adult; age; article; Australia; child abuse; child development; child neglect; conflict; controlled study; domestic violence; experience; family life; female; happiness; human; human relation; interview; longitudinal study; major clinical stud Child abuse; Childhood adversity; Community surveys; Epidemiology; Family relations
dc.titleChildhood adversity in an Australian population
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume39
dc.date.issued2004
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub7959
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationRosenman, Stephen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRodgers, Bryan, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue9
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage695
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage702
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-004-0802-0
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:49:32Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-5644262850
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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