Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Patch use by the greater glider (Petauroides volans) in a fragmented forest ecosystem. II. Characteristics of den trees and preliminary data on den-use patterns

Pope, M; Cunningham, Ross; Lindenmayer, David B

Description

This paper presents the results of a study of the use of den trees by the greater glider (Petauroides volans) in five patches of remnant eucalypt forest embedded within an extensive radiata pine (Pinus radiata) plantation near Tumut in south-eastern Australia. Radio-tracking was used to identify 171 den trees occupied by 40 animals over 948 animal-tracking days between September 1997 and September 1998. All radio-tracked P. volans used multiple den trees. Males used significantly more den trees...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPope, M
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Ross
dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:44:03Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:44:03Z
dc.identifier.issn1035-3712
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/79484
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents the results of a study of the use of den trees by the greater glider (Petauroides volans) in five patches of remnant eucalypt forest embedded within an extensive radiata pine (Pinus radiata) plantation near Tumut in south-eastern Australia. Radio-tracking was used to identify 171 den trees occupied by 40 animals over 948 animal-tracking days between September 1997 and September 1998. All radio-tracked P. volans used multiple den trees. Males used significantly more den trees than females and a greater proportion of these were used for single visits. Males also used fewer new den trees over the study period in the smaller patches, although they still used more than females. In the larger patches, males and females used similar numbers of den trees. Commonly used den trees tended to be situated in (or close to) core areas of an individual's home range. Den tree sharing, either concurrently or independently, was predominantly between adult males and females, or between adults and their young. Trees most likely to be used by more than one individual had the same characteristics as trees that had the highest probability of use per se - that is, they were of large 'average size'.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.sourceWildlife Research
dc.subjectKeywords: den; forest ecosystem; marsupial; patch use; radiotelemetry; Australasia; Australia; Eastern Hemisphere; New South Wales; Tumut; World; Animalia; Petauroides volans; Pinus radiata
dc.titlePatch use by the greater glider (Petauroides volans) in a fragmented forest ecosystem. II. Characteristics of den trees and preliminary data on den-use patterns
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume31
dc.date.issued2004
local.identifier.absfor050299 - Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub7915
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLindenmayer, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPope, M, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCunningham, Ross, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage569
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage577
local.identifier.doi10.1071/WR02111
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:15:43Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-13844267008
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

There are no files associated with this item.


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator