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Indigenous Australians and the rules of the social security system: Universalism, appropriateness and justice

Sanders, William

Description

Noel Pearson has recently argued that inclusion, over the last 30 years, in a 'passive' welfare system has been to the detriment of Aboriginal society. This article approaches the inclusion of Aboriginal people in the social security system from a slightly different perspective, while taking seriously Pearson's concerns. It argues that, despite norms and aspirations of universalism, rules within the social security system are social constructs derived from and intended for the particular social...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSanders, William
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:44:00Z
dc.identifier.issn0313-6647
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/79458
dc.description.abstractNoel Pearson has recently argued that inclusion, over the last 30 years, in a 'passive' welfare system has been to the detriment of Aboriginal society. This article approaches the inclusion of Aboriginal people in the social security system from a slightly different perspective, while taking seriously Pearson's concerns. It argues that, despite norms and aspirations of universalism, rules within the social security system are social constructs derived from and intended for the particular social and economic circumstances of the dominant society. When those rules are applied to the very different social and economic circumstances of minority groups, such as Indigenous Australians, major issues of adaptation and interpretation arise. This article draws on research experience spanning 20 years on relations between Indigenous Australians and the social security system to illustrate the degree to which adaptation has occurred, in the pursuit of realism. However, it also argues that current relations between the social security system and Indigenous Australians are not just and fair because the rules of the system do not equally reflect Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples' social and economic circumstances.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of Public Administration
dc.titleIndigenous Australians and the rules of the social security system: Universalism, appropriateness and justice
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume63
dc.date.issued2004
local.identifier.absfor160512 - Social Policy
local.identifier.absfor169902 - Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub7895
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSanders, William, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage3
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage9
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-8500.2004.00385.x
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:15:25Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-7044264912
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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