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Genetic analyses of historic and modern marbled murrelets suggest decoupling of migration and gene flow after habitat fragmentation

Peery, M. Zachariah; Hall, Laurie A.; Sellas, Anna; Beissinger, Steven R.; Berube, Martine; Raphael, Martin G.; Nelson, S. Kim; Golightly, Richard T.; McFarlane-Tranquilla, Laura; Newman, Scott; Palsboll, Per J.; Moritz, Craig

Description

The dispersal of individuals among fragmented populations is generally thought to prevent genetic and demographic isolation, and ultimately reduce extinction risk. In this study, we show that a century of reduction in coastal old-growth forests, as well as a number of other environmental factors, has probably resulted in the genetic divergence of marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in central California, despite the fact that 7 per cent of modern-sampled murrelets in this population...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPeery, M. Zachariah
dc.contributor.authorHall, Laurie A.
dc.contributor.authorSellas, Anna
dc.contributor.authorBeissinger, Steven R.
dc.contributor.authorBerube, Martine
dc.contributor.authorRaphael, Martin G.
dc.contributor.authorNelson, S. Kim
dc.contributor.authorGolightly, Richard T.
dc.contributor.authorMcFarlane-Tranquilla, Laura
dc.contributor.authorNewman, Scott
dc.contributor.authorPalsboll, Per J.
dc.contributor.authorMoritz, Craig
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:43:17Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/79138
dc.description.abstractThe dispersal of individuals among fragmented populations is generally thought to prevent genetic and demographic isolation, and ultimately reduce extinction risk. In this study, we show that a century of reduction in coastal old-growth forests, as well as a number of other environmental factors, has probably resulted in the genetic divergence of marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in central California, despite the fact that 7 per cent of modern-sampled murrelets in this population were classified as migrants using genetic assignment tests. Genetic differentiation appears to persist because individuals dispersing from northern populations contributed relatively few young to the central California population, as indicated by the fact that migrants were much less likely to be members of parent-offspring pairs than residents (10.5% versus 45.4%). Moreover, a recent 1.4 per cent annual increase in the proportion of migrants in central California, without appreciable reproduction, may have masked an underlying decline in the resident population without resulting in demographic rescue. Our results emphasize the need to understand the behaviour of migrants and the extent to which they contribute offspring in order to determine whether dispersal results in gene flow and prevents declines in resident populations.
dc.publisherRoyal Society of London
dc.sourceProceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences
dc.subjectKeywords: disease vector; dispersal; extinction risk; gene flow; genetic analysis; genetic isolation; genetic variation; habitat fragmentation; migration; old-growth forest; seabird; animal; article; Charadriiformes; ecosystem; environmental protection; gene flow; Dispersal; Genetic variation; Habitat fragmentation; Marbled murrelet; Old-growth forest; Rescue effects
dc.titleGenetic analyses of historic and modern marbled murrelets suggest decoupling of migration and gene flow after habitat fragmentation
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume277
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor060302 - Biogeography and Phylogeography
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB7649
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPeery, M. Zachariah, University of Wisconsin-Madison
local.contributor.affiliationHall, Laurie A., Moss Landing Marine Laboratories
local.contributor.affiliationSellas, Anna, University of California
local.contributor.affiliationBeissinger, Steven R., University of California
local.contributor.affiliationMoritz, Craig, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBerube, Martine, University of California
local.contributor.affiliationRaphael, Martin G., US Department of Agriculture Forest Service
local.contributor.affiliationNelson, S. Kim, Oregon State University
local.contributor.affiliationGolightly, Richard T., Humboldt State University
local.contributor.affiliationMcFarlane-Tranquilla, Laura, Simon Fraser University
local.contributor.affiliationNewman, Scott, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
local.contributor.affiliationPalsboll, Per J., University of California
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1682
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage697
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage706
local.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2009.1666
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:36:19Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77649210753
local.identifier.thomsonID000273882800006
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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