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Actin microfilament and microtubule distribution patterns in the expanding root of Aribidopsis thaliana

Collings, David; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

Description

Determination of the precise role(s) of actin microfilaments in the control of cell shape and elongation in the root tips of the model genetic system Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh is frustrated by inadequate microscopy imaging techniques. In this paper, we documented both microfilaments and microtubules in the root tips of Arabidopsis by double immunofluorescence labelling and computer-generated reconstruction of confocal image series. Our procedure, which complements the use of recently...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCollings, David
dc.contributor.authorWasteneys, Geoffrey O
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:43:01Z
dc.identifier.issn0008-4026
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/79011
dc.description.abstractDetermination of the precise role(s) of actin microfilaments in the control of cell shape and elongation in the root tips of the model genetic system Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh is frustrated by inadequate microscopy imaging techniques. In this paper, we documented both microfilaments and microtubules in the root tips of Arabidopsis by double immunofluorescence labelling and computer-generated reconstruction of confocal image series. Our procedure, which complements the use of recently developed fluorescent reporter proteins, revealed hitherto undescribed aspects of the Arabidopsis microfilament cytoskeleton that may provide important clues about mechanisms behind cell elongation. We found that preservation of extensive arrays of transverse cortical microfilaments depends on unperturbed microtubule organization. Compared with ordinary epidermal cells, cells situated in the trichoblast or hair-forming cell files were comparatively devoid of endoplasmic microfilaments when in the distal elongation zone, well before hair formation begins. Computer-aided reconstructions also revealed that the nonexpanding end walls of cells in the distal elongation zone have radially oriented microtubules and randomly arranged microfilaments. In dividing cells, microfilaments became more prominent in the cell cortex, and subtle differences between microtubule and microfilament organization were seen within the phragmoplast. These observations will form the basis of understanding the roles of the cytoskeleton in controlling elongation in root tissues. In light of the many Arabidopsis mutants with altered root morphology, our methods offer a reliable approach to assess the function of cytoskeletal proteins and signalling systems in root morphogenesis.
dc.publisherNRC Research Press
dc.sourceCanadian Journal of Botany
dc.subjectKeywords: Cells; Image reconstruction; Imaging techniques; Microscopic examination; Actin microfilaments; Arabidopsis thaliana; Distal elongation zone; Microtubules; Phragmoplast; Plants (botany); botany; Cells; Image Analysis; Microscopy; Plants; Roots; Arabidopsi Actin microfilaments; Arabidopsis thaliana; Distal elongation zone; Microtubules; Phragmoplast; Roots
dc.titleActin microfilament and microtubule distribution patterns in the expanding root of Aribidopsis thaliana
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume83
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor070303 - Crop and Pasture Biochemistry and Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub7553
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCollings, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWasteneys, Geoffrey O, University of British Columbia
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage579
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage590
local.identifier.doi10.1139/b05-032
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:10:15Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-26244466535
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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