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Sexual imprinting on ecologically divergent traits leads to sexual isolation in sticklebacks

Kozak, G.M.; Head, Megan; Boughman, Janette W.

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During sexual imprinting, offspring learn parental phenotypes and then select mates who are similar to their parents. Imprinting has been thought to contribute to the process of speciation in only a few rare cases; this is despite imprinting's potential to generate assortative mating and solve the problem of recombination in ecological speciation. If offspring imprint on parental traits under divergent selection, these traits will then be involved in both adaptation and mate preference. Such...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKozak, G.M.
dc.contributor.authorHead, Megan
dc.contributor.authorBoughman, Janette W.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:42:00Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/78766
dc.description.abstractDuring sexual imprinting, offspring learn parental phenotypes and then select mates who are similar to their parents. Imprinting has been thought to contribute to the process of speciation in only a few rare cases; this is despite imprinting's potential to generate assortative mating and solve the problem of recombination in ecological speciation. If offspring imprint on parental traits under divergent selection, these traits will then be involved in both adaptation and mate preference. Such 'magic traits' easily generate sexual isolation and facilitate speciation. In this study, we show that imprinting occurs in two ecologically divergent stickleback species (benthics and limnetics: Gasterosteus spp.). Cross-fostered females preferred mates of their foster father's species. Furthermore, imprinting is essential for sexual isolation between species; isolation was reduced when females were raised without fathers. Daughters imprinted on father odour and colour during a critical period early in development. These traits have diverged between the species owing to differences in ecology. Therefore, we provide the first evidence that imprinting links ecological adaptation to sexual isolation between species. Our results suggest that imprinting may facilitate the evolution of sexual isolation during ecological speciation, may be especially important in cases of rapid diversification, and thus play an integral role in the generation of biodiversity.
dc.publisherRoyal Society of London
dc.sourceProceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences
dc.subjectKeywords: adaptation; assortative mating; biodiversity; divergence; imprinting; lacustrine environment; life history trait; mate recognition; parental care; phenotype; reproductive isolation; speciation (biology); teleost; zoobenthos; animal; article; decision maki Ecological speciation; Learning; Mate recognition; Reproductive isolation
dc.titleSexual imprinting on ecologically divergent traits leads to sexual isolation in sticklebacks
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume278
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.absfor060311 - Speciation and Extinction
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB7351
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationKozak, G.M., University of Wisconsin
local.contributor.affiliationHead, Megan, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBoughman, Janette W., Michigan State University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1718
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2604
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2610
local.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2010.2466
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:34:22Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-79960820256
local.identifier.thomsonID000293142200008
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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