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Characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis omp1 genotypes detected in eye swab samples from remote Australian communities

Stevens, Matthew; Tabrizi, Sepehr; Muller, Rosanne; Krause, Victoria; Garland, Suzanne

Description

Chlamydia trachomatis conjunctival samples collected over a 6-month period from individuals with clinical signs of trachoma and located in remote communities in the Australian Northern Territory were differentially characterized according to serovar and variants. The rationale was to gain an understanding of the epidemiology of an apparent increased prevalence of acute trachoma in areas thought to be less conducive to this disease. Characterization was performed through sequencing of a region...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorStevens, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorTabrizi, Sepehr
dc.contributor.authorMuller, Rosanne
dc.contributor.authorKrause, Victoria
dc.contributor.authorGarland, Suzanne
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:41:48Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:41:48Z
dc.identifier.issn0095-1137
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/78669
dc.description.abstractChlamydia trachomatis conjunctival samples collected over a 6-month period from individuals with clinical signs of trachoma and located in remote communities in the Australian Northern Territory were differentially characterized according to serovar and variants. The rationale was to gain an understanding of the epidemiology of an apparent increased prevalence of acute trachoma in areas thought to be less conducive to this disease. Characterization was performed through sequencing of a region of the omp1 gene spanning the four variable domains and encoding the major outer membrane protein. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were genotyped by using a BLAST similarity search and were examined by phylogenetic analyses to illustrate evolutionary relationships between the clinical and GenBank reference strains. The predominant genotype identified corresponded to that of serovar C (87.1%), followed by the genotype corresponding to serovar Ba (12.9%). All nucleotide and amino acid sequences exhibited minor levels of variation with respect to GenBank reference sequences. The omp1 nucleotide sequences of the clinical samples best aligned with those of the conjunctival C. trachomatis reference strains C/TW-3/OT and Ba/Apache-2. All clinical samples (of serovar C) exhibited four or five nucleotide changes compared with C/TW-3/OT, while all serovar Ba samples had one or two nucleotide differences from Ba/Apache-2. Phylogenetic analyses revealed close relationships between these Northern Territory chlamydial samples and the respective reference strains, although the high proportion of sequence variants suggests an evolutionarily distinct C. trachomatis population causing eye infections in Australia. Given that such genotypic information has gone unreported, these findings provide knowledge and a foundation for trachoma-associated C. trachomatis variants circulating in the Northern Territory.
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology
dc.sourceJournal of Clinical Microbiology
dc.subjectKeywords: DNA; outer membrane protein; adolescent; adult; article; Australia; bacterial gene; child; Chlamydia; Chlamydia trachomatis; chlamydiasis; clinical article; eye infection; genotype; human; infant; nonhuman; nucleotide sequence; omp1 gene; phylogeny; polym
dc.titleCharacterization of Chlamydia trachomatis omp1 genotypes detected in eye swab samples from remote Australian communities
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume42
dc.date.issued2004
local.identifier.absfor110801 - Medical Bacteriology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub7275
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationStevens, Matthew, Royal Women's Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationTabrizi, Sepehr, Royal Women's Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationMuller, Rosanne, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKrause, Victoria, NT Department of Health & Community Services
local.contributor.affiliationGarland, Suzanne, Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2501
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2507
local.identifier.doi10.1128/JCM.42.6.2501-2507.2004
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:03:30Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-2942594189
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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