Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Nonresponse Bias in a General Population Survey of Eating-Disordered Behaviour

Mond, Jonathan; Hay, Phillipa J; Owen, Cathy; Beumont, Pierre J V; Rodgers, Bryan

Description

Objective: To investigate nonresponse bias in a two-phase epidemiologic study of eating-disordered behavior. Method: Self-report questionnaires were delivered to a community sample of women aged 18-45 drawn from the electoral roll. Follow-up interviews were completed with a subgroup of respondents. Eating disorder psychopathology, general physical and mental health, and sociodemographic characteristics were compared among early (n = 259) and late (n = 71) respondents at the first phase of the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMond, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorHay, Phillipa J
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Cathy
dc.contributor.authorBeumont, Pierre J V
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Bryan
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:39:18Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:39:18Z
dc.identifier.issn1098-108X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/77723
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate nonresponse bias in a two-phase epidemiologic study of eating-disordered behavior. Method: Self-report questionnaires were delivered to a community sample of women aged 18-45 drawn from the electoral roll. Follow-up interviews were completed with a subgroup of respondents. Eating disorder psychopathology, general physical and mental health, and sociodemographic characteristics were compared among early (n = 259) and late (n = 71) respondents at the first phase of the study and among individuals with whom interviews were completed (n = 208) and individuals declining to be interviewed (n = 63) at the second phase. Results: With respect to levels of eating disorder psychopathology, and on all other measures, individuals who responded at the first phase of the study only after repeated reminders did not differ from those who responded to the initial mailout, and individuals who declined to be interviewed did not differ from individuals with whom interviews were completed. Conclusions: Nonresponse bias among individuals declining to be interviewed is unlikely to pose a problem in two-phase epidemiologic studies of eating disorders. Further research is needed to examine the characteristics of nonrespondents at the first phase of such studies.
dc.publisherWiley-VCH Verlag GMBH
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; article; demography; eating disorder; epidemiological data; feeding behavior; female; health survey; human; interview; major clinical study; mental disease; mental health; population research; priority journal; questionnaire; self report; Adolescen Eating disorders; Epidemiologic research; Nonresponse bias; Two-phase design
dc.titleNonresponse Bias in a General Population Survey of Eating-Disordered Behaviour
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume36
dc.date.issued2004
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub6526
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMond, Jonathan, James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationRodgers, Bryan, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHay, Phillipa J, James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationOwen, Cathy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBeumont, Pierre J V, University of Sydney
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage89
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage98
local.identifier.doi10.1002/eat.20007
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:48:09Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-2942655522
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

There are no files associated with this item.


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator