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Blood pressure-related cognitive decline: does age make a difference?

Elias, Penelope K; Elias, Merrill F; Robbins, Michael A; Budge, Marc

Description

Systolic and diastolic blood pressures have been inversely related to cognitive performance in prospective and cross-sectional studies. However, in large, community-based samples, these findings have been limited to older adults. In this 20-year longitudinal study, we examined the relationship between baseline blood pressure and cognitive decline for 529 participants using 2 age groups (18 to 46 years and 47 to 83 years). Cognitive performance was measured over multiple examinations with the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorElias, Penelope K
dc.contributor.authorElias, Merrill F
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Michael A
dc.contributor.authorBudge, Marc
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:38:00Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:38:00Z
dc.identifier.issn0194-911X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/77347
dc.description.abstractSystolic and diastolic blood pressures have been inversely related to cognitive performance in prospective and cross-sectional studies. However, in large, community-based samples, these findings have been limited to older adults. In this 20-year longitudinal study, we examined the relationship between baseline blood pressure and cognitive decline for 529 participants using 2 age groups (18 to 46 years and 47 to 83 years). Cognitive performance was measured over multiple examinations with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale from which 4 scores were derived by factor analysis. A 2-stage growth curve method of analysis was used to model cognitive change. Results indicated that higher levels of baseline systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and blood pressure categories as defined by the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure were significantly associated with decline in Visualization/Fluid abilities in both younger and older age groups. Young adults are as susceptible to blood pressure-related longitudinal decline in cognitive performance as are older adults.
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
dc.sourceHypertension
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; age distribution; aged; article; blood pressure monitoring; cognition; cognitive defect; controlled study; diastolic blood pressure; disease predisposition; factorial analysis; female; human; intelligence test; longitudinal study; male; mean arteri Age; Arterial hypertension; Blood pressure; Cognition; Prospective studies; Risk factors
dc.titleBlood pressure-related cognitive decline: does age make a difference?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume44
dc.date.issued2004
local.identifier.absfor110308 - Geriatrics and Gerontology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub6223
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationElias, Penelope K, University of Maine
local.contributor.affiliationElias, Merrill F, University of Maine
local.contributor.affiliationRobbins, Michael A, University of Maine
local.contributor.affiliationBudge, Marc, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage631
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage636
local.identifier.doi10.1161/01.HYP.0000145858.07252.99
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:48:47Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-7244236386
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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